Scientists working at physical containment level four (PC4), the highest level available.

Safeguarding Australia

Providing an integrated approach to Australia's national biosecurity combining world-leading scientific expertise with cutting-edge diagnostic, surveillance and response capabilities.

White-tailed spider

White-tailed spiders are common in urban environments and are often found wandering houses at night in search of prey. Their bite has been implicated in tissue ulceration; however there has been little evidence to substantiate such claims.

Controlling mesquite in northern Australia

Scientists at CSIRO are using an integrated management approach aimed at providing a basis for long-term management of mesquite, including mechanical, chemical and biological techniques and the use of fire and grazing strategies.

New guidelines for predicting fire behaviour

The findings of Australia’s most extensive study to date of the behaviour of high-intensity bushfires in eucalypt forests – Project Vesta – provides valuable new tools and information for fire managers across Australia.

ECOS Issue 140: Time for a sea change in coastal development

Ecos 140 looks at the future of a remote and pristine stretch of the South Australian coastline that has become the focus of intense debate between local environment groups, developers and government. The case reflects the intensifying pressure on Australia’s coastal habitats as developments follow the quest for sea-side properties.

Environmentally friendly insecticides

By targetting the chemistry of the insects own hormones, CSIRO is developing a new class of insecticide that is pest-specific and produces no harmful side-effects.

Water: a fresh approach

In this two-page article from SOLVE magazine, read about how science is meeting the challenge of finding ways to reduce Australia’s wasteful water practices and improve the way we use and manage this finite resource.

Re-writing ‘the book’ on a devastating poultry disease

A world-first discovery made by a Monash University PhD student working at CSIRO’s Australian Animal Health Laboratory (AAHL) in Geelong, has poultry scientists worldwide taking a fresh look at the devastating bacterial disease, necrotic enteritis.

DNA blueprint for healthier and more efficient cows

Ground breaking findings by an international consortium of scientists who sequenced and analysed the bovine genome, could result in more sustainable food production.

Myxomatosis and rabbits in Australia today

Introduced by CSIRO in 1950, myxomatosis almost wiped out Australia’s pest rabbits. Natural selection has led to a balance between myxoma virus and wild rabbits today, but pet bunnies remain highly susceptible.

CSIRO Fire Spread Meter for Northern Australia

The CSIRO Fire Spread Meter for Northern Australia predicts the rate of spread of fires in open grassland, woodland, and open forest with a grassy understorey.

Bitou bush biocontrol agent: the leaf-rolling moth

CSIRO Entomology and New South Wales Agriculture collaborated on a project to rear, release and evaluate the performance of the leaf-rolling moth Tortrix species to help control bitou bush.

Biological control of Cape tulips

The pasture weeds, Cape tulips, are considered suitable targets for biological control because there are few close relatives among Australian native species and no related crops.

Large Animal Facility (LAF)

AAHL is globally unique in enabling work on infected livestock at Physical Containment level 4 (PC4). This capability further strengthens our ability to protect Australia's animal and people from disease outbreaks.

Management of invasive European blackberry

A new three-year blackberry biological control project has begun to coordinate the national release of eight additional strains of the leaf-rust fungus Phragmidium violaceum, with potential to enhance biological control of invasive European blackberry in Australia.

Family planning for wild radish

New research into the increasingly herbicide-tolerant wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum) has revealed increased potential for two ‘contraceptive’ approaches to controlling the noxious weed.

New tool to fast-track genetic gain in sheep

Scientists from CSIRO are part of an international team that today launched a new genomic tool which is set to transform the future selection and breeding of sheep around the world.

Cape tulips – pretty but pests in pastures

CSIRO and the Department of Agriculture and Food Western Australia (DAFWA) are collaborating to try to outwit one of southern Australia’s worst agricultural weeds.

Dr Ken McColl: understanding aquatic animal disease

Dr Ken McColl is a veterinary virologist and pathologist specialising in aquatic animal health at the AAHL Fish Diseases Laboratory in Geelong, Victoria.

Biological control of Onopordum thistles in South-East Australia

CSIRO researchers have successfully released biological agents to attack Onopordum thistles that thrive in high fertility soils in south-east Australia.

War on willows

Willows are major environmental weeds of riverbank habitats across much of south-eastern Australia. They obstruct water flow, increase water temperature, change water chemistry and can displace native riverine plant species.

Improving wheat yields for global food security

With the world’s population set to reach 8.9 billion by 2050, CSIRO scientists are hunting down and exploiting a number of wheat’s key genetic traits in a bid to substantially boost its grain yield.

Parts of a fire

Bushfires have heading, backing and flanking fires. Each of these components of the overall bushfire has different characteristics.

The virus that stunned Australia's rabbits

Read how CSIRO stopped rabbits in their tracks in the 1950s. In the 1950s, millions of rabbits were decimating Australian agriculture and destroying the environment. CSIRO scientists responded by releasing a virus that had a dramatic effect.

What a tangled food web

Scientists are studying interactions between insect communities in crop and non-crop vegetation to help get the most out of natural pest control. (2 pages)

Invasive ant researchers invade the Top End

Some of the world’s worst invasive species will be the focus of an international workshop in Darwin this week.

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