Scientists working at physical containment level four (PC4), the highest level available.

Safeguarding Australia

Providing an integrated approach to Australia's national biosecurity combining world-leading scientific expertise with cutting-edge diagnostic, surveillance and response capabilities.

What happens to landscapes after a tropical cyclone? (Podcast 28 Sep 2007)

Professor Steve Turton talks about the impacts of Cyclone Larry. (5:45)

Mitigation of disease impact through modification of the host response

CSIRO’s Mitigation of disease impact through modification of the host response research aims to develop novel strategies and products to limit the spread of major animal diseases.

Rust fungus to tear backbone out of boneseed

CSIRO’s newly refurbished containment facility for exotic insects and plant pathogens in Canberra is hosting a species of rust fungus which shows promise as a biocontrol agent for the highly invasive plant pest, boneseed.

Cooling grain reaps benefits for storers and marketers

Cooling during storage can maintain grain in premium condition and maximise its market potential.

Preparing Australia for a Russian wheat aphid invasion

CSIRO scientists are studying how Russian wheat aphid, Diuraphis noxia successfully overcomes resistance in wheat in order to protect Australian farmers from this devastating invasive pest.

The Bushfire CRC: understanding bushfires through collaboration

The bushfire research program at CSIRO is part of a large-scale collaborative effort.

Biological control of silverleaf whitefly

Our scientists are researching the biological processes that enable silverleaf whitefly to invade, and investigating the role of landscape structure and scale in exploiting an effective biocontrol agent for this pest species.

Understanding bushfire impact on water yield

In the summer of 2002-03, devastating bushfires destroyed 700 000 hectares of forest in northeast Victoria. CSIRO scientists used remote sensing technologies to estimate the impact of the fires on water yield in major catchment areas.

Re-writing ‘the book’ on a devastating poultry disease

A world-first discovery made by a Monash University PhD student working at CSIRO’s Australian Animal Health Laboratory (AAHL) in Geelong, has poultry scientists worldwide taking a fresh look at the devastating bacterial disease, necrotic enteritis.

McArthur Mk 5 Forest Fire Danger Meter

The CSIRO Fire Danger and Fire Spread Calculator is assisting rural fire authorities across Australia. Download the 855 KB zip file to use the CSIRO McArthur MK 5 Forest Fire Danger Meter as a computer program.

Biological control of blue heliotrope

CSIRO investigated possible biological control options for the introduced plant, blue heliotrope, which is now a major weed in some areas.

Controlling bridal creeper

In this video see how scientists have found a rust fungus capable of causing severe damage to and eventually killing bridal creeper, one of Australia’s worst environmental weeds. (2:30)

Mesquite biocontrol with the sap-sucking Coreid, Mozena obtusa

The sap-sucking Coreid, Mozena obtusa was investigated as a potential biological control agent for mesquite, a woody weed invading semi-arid and arid parts of Australia.

CSIRO cane toad research

CSIRO scientists have explored the use of gene technology to reduce the number of Australian cane toads.

Breakthrough in fight against Hendra virus

There has been a breakthrough in the fight against the deadly Hendra virus following the development of a treatment which shows great potential to save the lives of people who become infected with the virus.

The virus that stunned Australia's rabbits

Read how CSIRO stopped rabbits in their tracks in the 1950s. In the 1950s, millions of rabbits were decimating Australian agriculture and destroying the environment. CSIRO scientists responded by releasing a virus that had a dramatic effect.

What a tangled food web

Scientists are studying interactions between insect communities in crop and non-crop vegetation to help get the most out of natural pest control. (2 pages)

Protecting Tasmania’s salmon industry (Podcast 16 Aug 2007)

Tasmania is renowned for its Atlantic salmon, but the fish are under attack from amoebic gill disease and in this podast Dr Mathew Cook, from CSIRO and the Food Futures Flagship, talks about a new a vaccine designed to boost the productivity of Tasmania’s  A$230 million a year Atlantic salmon industry. (4:53)

CSIRO Entomology: a sense of history

On 30 June 2010, Dr Jim Cullen presented an overview of the history of CSIRO's Division of Entomology from 1928 to 2010. Watch his presentation in the video below (73:12) or download the PowerPoint slides. (177 pages)

Rabbits on the back foot – but naturally they’re fighting back

Australian rabbits have had everything but the kitchen sink thrown at them over the years. Myxomatosis knocked them about but they bounced back. The same with rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) or the calicivirus.

CSIRO Grassland Fire Spread Meter

The CSIRO Grassland Fire Spread Meter is used by rural fire authorities to predict a fire’s potential rate of forward spread across continuous grassland in gently undulating terrain.

Eradicating pest ants from the Top End

CSIRO scientists lead research into the ecology, impacts and control of invasive ant species in northern Australia. A successful eradication project in Kakadu has paved the way for CSIRO leadership of a range of other pest ant management projects.

Emergency detection and response

CSIRO technologies are helping Australians prepare for, detect, respond to and recover from natural disasters and emergency situations.

Going viral: CSIRO vs Contagion (Podcast 28 Oct 2011)

A reference to research undertaken by CSIRO's 'bat pack' team in Hollywood's latest disaster flick Contagion highlights the role CSIRO's Australian Animal Health Laboratory (AAHL) would play in a real-world version of the pandemic. (11:12)

The Hidden crisis in the Murray-Darling Basin (Podcast 19 Jun 2008)

The drought in the Murray-Darling Basin continues, but lack of rainfall is not the only woe to afflict one of the country’s most productive agricultural regions. In this podcast, CSIRO’s Dr Ian Smith, Co-Ordinator of the South East Australia Climate Initiative, explains that global warming has a less obvious, but very real, threat. (6.06)  

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