Scientists working at physical containment level four (PC4), the highest level available.

Safeguarding Australia

Providing an integrated approach to Australia's national biosecurity combining world-leading scientific expertise with cutting-edge diagnostic, surveillance and response capabilities.

The Bushfire CRC: understanding bushfires through collaboration

The bushfire research program at CSIRO is part of a large-scale collaborative effort.

Biological control of silverleaf whitefly

Our scientists are researching the biological processes that enable silverleaf whitefly to invade, and investigating the role of landscape structure and scale in exploiting an effective biocontrol agent for this pest species.

A vaccine for gill disease in Atlantic salmon

Scientists are working with Atlantic salmon growers to develop a vaccine against amoebic gill disease, a major health problem for the Tasmanian industry.

Understanding bushfire impact on water yield

In the summer of 2002-03, devastating bushfires destroyed 700 000 hectares of forest in northeast Victoria. CSIRO scientists used remote sensing technologies to estimate the impact of the fires on water yield in major catchment areas.

Download SiroFire - The Bushfire Spread Simulator

Understanding probably wildfire spread is vital to the efficient use of firefighting resources. CSIRO scientists developed SiroFire, a computer-based real-time bushfire spread simulator, to give fire control authorities a fast operational tool to predict wildfire spread.

Safeguarding Australia against infectious diseases

We protect the health of Australia's people, animals, environment and trade through our research to detect and control infectious diseases.

An introduction to physical-statistical modelling using Bayesian methods

This 18-page technical report by CSIRO’s Dr Edward Campbell discusses integrating physical and statistical models using Bayesian methods. This approach helps environmental scientists deal with uncertainty in forecasting.

Re-writing ‘the book’ on a devastating poultry disease

A world-first discovery made by a Monash University PhD student working at CSIRO’s Australian Animal Health Laboratory (AAHL) in Geelong, has poultry scientists worldwide taking a fresh look at the devastating bacterial disease, necrotic enteritis.

Australian technology used during Australian equine flu outbreak (Podcast 27 Aug 2007)

Dr Hans Heine from CSIRO’s Australian Animal Health Laboratory describes how scientists are diagnosing cases of equine flu using tests developed by CSIRO and the Australian Biosecurity Cooperative Research Centre. (3:51)  

Biological control of blue heliotrope

CSIRO investigated possible biological control options for the introduced plant, blue heliotrope, which is now a major weed in some areas.

Controlling bridal creeper

In this video see how scientists have found a rust fungus capable of causing severe damage to and eventually killing bridal creeper, one of Australia’s worst environmental weeds. (2:30)

Mesquite biocontrol with the sap-sucking Coreid, Mozena obtusa

The sap-sucking Coreid, Mozena obtusa was investigated as a potential biological control agent for mesquite, a woody weed invading semi-arid and arid parts of Australia.

CSIRO cane toad research

CSIRO scientists have explored the use of gene technology to reduce the number of Australian cane toads.

Scientific papers (2008): plant diseases and pests

This page lists all CSIRO Plant Industry's scientific papers published in 2008 related to plant diseases and pests.

Dr Robert Moore: leading research to modulate host responses

Dr Rob Moore is a molecular biologist working to improve poultry health and productivity by developing vaccines and therapeutics for the poultry industry.

Scientific papers (2007): plant diseases and pests

This page lists all CSIRO Plant Industry's scientific papers published in 2007 related to plant diseases and pests.

Myxomatosis and rabbits in Australia today

Introduced by CSIRO in 1950, myxomatosis almost wiped out Australia’s pest rabbits. Natural selection has led to a balance between myxoma virus and wild rabbits today, but pet bunnies remain highly susceptible.

The virus that stunned Australia's rabbits

Read how CSIRO stopped rabbits in their tracks in the 1950s. In the 1950s, millions of rabbits were decimating Australian agriculture and destroying the environment. CSIRO scientists responded by releasing a virus that had a dramatic effect.

What a tangled food web

Scientists are studying interactions between insect communities in crop and non-crop vegetation to help get the most out of natural pest control. (2 pages)

CSIRO helps build Australia’s quietest hospital

A team of CSIRO scientists have carried out sophisticated acoustic studies, in a quest to help create the quietest hospital in Australia.

165bridalSAWA Ento MedRelTsr

Community groups and land managers in South Australian and WA are being urged to renew their efforts to control one of southern Australia's worst environmental weeds, bridal creeper (Asparagus asparagoides).

95Climate CMAR MedRelTsr

Hollywood's latest disaster movie, The Day After Tomorrow, is about to be released. It is a fictional account of the havoc wreaked by out-of-control climate as North America is beset by the chilling beginnings of a new Ice Age in the course of 10 days. The movie features numerous catastrophic weather events including hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, and tidal waves striking New York.

Parkinsonia: an introduced woody weed

Scientists at CSIRO are researching long-term management strategies for Parkinsonia aculeata which can also be used as a model for understanding other woody weeds in the Australian landscape.

CSIRO Entomology: a sense of history

On 30 June 2010, Dr Jim Cullen presented an overview of the history of CSIRO's Division of Entomology from 1928 to 2010. Watch his presentation in the video below (73:12) or download the PowerPoint slides. (177 pages)

Understanding bushfires to protect lives and property

CSIRO's Bushfire Dynamics and Applications group develops tools and models to better understand bushfire behaviour and to protect lives and property.

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