Scientists working at physical containment level four (PC4), the highest level available.

Safeguarding Australia

Providing an integrated approach to Australia's national biosecurity combining world-leading scientific expertise with cutting-edge diagnostic, surveillance and response capabilities.

Trial by fire: testing a 'bushfire-proof' house design

Weather permitting, CSIRO scientists will 'flame-test' a steel-framed house near Mogo on the NSW south coast at 2pm today to see how the structure withstands realistic bushfire conditions.

159BOC Ento MedRelTsr

CSIRO and the global industrial gas company the BOC Group have signed a deal to deliver to the international market a new environmentally-safe fumigant for treating soil, insect pests, weeds and diseases.

Dr Helen Murphy: understanding tropical forest dynamics and threats

Dr Helen Murphy is interested in the dynamics of tropical forests and the role of invasive species and climate change in their structure and functioning.

Evolution of flying bat clue to cancer and viruses

The genes of long-living and virus resistant bats may provide clues to the future treatment and prevention of infectious diseases and cancer in people, researchers have found.

Rust fungus to tear backbone out of boneseed

CSIRO’s newly refurbished containment facility for exotic insects and plant pathogens in Canberra is hosting a species of rust fungus which shows promise as a biocontrol agent for the highly invasive plant pest, boneseed.

OzConverter

OzConverter is a specialist tool developed by Dr Tom Harwood, to assist in preparing climate change scenario files from OzClim.

Cooling grain reaps benefits for storers and marketers

Cooling during storage can maintain grain in premium condition and maximise its market potential.

Biological control of Emex: the weed and potential agents

The introduced weed, Emex, which costs A$40 million a year in crop losses and production costs in Western Australia alone, has been the target of a biolgical control program.

Livestock Horizons: Foot and Mouth Disease Science Update 2010

This newsletter highlights CSIRO's vital role and ongoing commitment in preparing for exotic animal disease outbreaks, particularly Foot and Mouth Disease. (2 pages)

Dr Michael Ayliffe: improving rust resistance

Dr Michael Ayliffe aims to improve rust resistance in cereals by using transgenic (gene technology) approaches.

Dr Darren Kriticos: modelling the future of pests in Australia

Dr Darren Kriticos is researching the effects of climate change impacts on pests and diseases in Australia, as well as regional biosecurity threats from potential new invasive species.

Thrips (Thysanoptera)

Thrips are often little known by most people, but some species are considered major agricultural pests.

Biological control of silverleaf whitefly

Our scientists are researching the biological processes that enable silverleaf whitefly to invade, and investigating the role of landscape structure and scale in exploiting an effective biocontrol agent for this pest species.

A vaccine for gill disease in Atlantic salmon

Scientists are working with Atlantic salmon growers to develop a vaccine against amoebic gill disease, a major health problem for the Tasmanian industry.

Download SiroFire - The Bushfire Spread Simulator

Understanding probably wildfire spread is vital to the efficient use of firefighting resources. CSIRO scientists developed SiroFire, a computer-based real-time bushfire spread simulator, to give fire control authorities a fast operational tool to predict wildfire spread.

Safeguarding Australia against infectious diseases

We protect the health of Australia's people, animals, environment and trade through our research to detect and control infectious diseases.

An introduction to physical-statistical modelling using Bayesian methods

This 18-page technical report by CSIRO’s Dr Edward Campbell discusses integrating physical and statistical models using Bayesian methods. This approach helps environmental scientists deal with uncertainty in forecasting.

Mozzie protein alert to invading viruses

CSIRO scientists have discovered how mosquitoes develop viral immunity, potentially leading to improved vaccines, and other control measures, for mosquito-borne viruses such as dengue and West Nile.

Australian technology used during Australian equine flu outbreak (Podcast 27 Aug 2007)

Dr Hans Heine from CSIRO’s Australian Animal Health Laboratory describes how scientists are diagnosing cases of equine flu using tests developed by CSIRO and the Australian Biosecurity Cooperative Research Centre. (3:51)  

Mesquite biocontrol with the sap-sucking Coreid, Mozena obtusa

The sap-sucking Coreid, Mozena obtusa was investigated as a potential biological control agent for mesquite, a woody weed invading semi-arid and arid parts of Australia.

CSIRO cane toad research

CSIRO scientists have explored the use of gene technology to reduce the number of Australian cane toads.

Scientific papers (2008): plant diseases and pests

This page lists all CSIRO Plant Industry's scientific papers published in 2008 related to plant diseases and pests.

Dr Robert Moore: leading research to modulate host responses

Dr Rob Moore is a molecular biologist working to improve poultry health and productivity by developing vaccines and therapeutics for the poultry industry.

Scientific papers (2007): plant diseases and pests

This page lists all CSIRO Plant Industry's scientific papers published in 2007 related to plant diseases and pests.

Myxomatosis and rabbits in Australia today

Introduced by CSIRO in 1950, myxomatosis almost wiped out Australia’s pest rabbits. Natural selection has led to a balance between myxoma virus and wild rabbits today, but pet bunnies remain highly susceptible.

Page 4 of 27