Scientists working at physical containment level four (PC4), the highest level available.

Safeguarding Australia

Providing an integrated approach to Australia's national biosecurity combining world-leading scientific expertise with cutting-edge diagnostic, surveillance and response capabilities.

Mimosa biological control project

CSIRO scientists are researching new biological control agents to help manage and control Mimosa pigra, an introduced weed invading wetlands in tropical Australia.

Locating bushfires as they happen

Sentinel Hotspots provides reliable 'eyes' in the sky for Emergency Services, using satellite images to locate and map bushfires occurring in Australia and providing the information to anyone on the internet.

Sustainable farming

CSIRO is studying management practices such as crop sequence, nitrogen fertiliser application, and tillage and stubble management with the aim of helping farms remain sustainable and profitable into the future.

Biological control of cabomba

CSIRO Entomology has started a project to discover and test biological control agents from cabomba's home range of Argentina and adjacent countries in an effort to find a long-term sustainable solution to control this aquatic weed.

CSIRO scientists appointed to the Eminent Scientists Group of Biosecurity Australia

Two CSIRO scientists have been appointed to the Eminent Scientists Group  of Biosecurity Australia to enhance the scientific assessment and management of pest and disease risks associated with proposed agricultural imports.

Farming Ahead: CSIRO and related articles from 2009

Farming Ahead magazine regularly features CSIRO's research for the agricultural sector. This is a list of CSIRO articles published in the magazine throughout 2009.

The picnickers nightmare: European wasp

Accidentally imported from Europe, European wasps now disrupt outdoor recreational activities and threaten native insects in southern Australia.

Science for tomorrow: New developments

This article from Farming Ahead contains three stories on resistance to wheat streak mosaic virus, the Indian Ocean imprint in Australia’s south-east and fighting flystrike in sheep. (1 page)

Rabbit calicivirus disease (RCD)

This fact sheet details the use of rabbit calicivirus disease (RCD) as a biological control for rabbits in Australia. (2 pages)

Working to safeguard Australia from animal disease threats

CSIRO works with government agencies, laboratories, research institutions and industry to ensure trade access for Australia’s livestock and livestock products.

Managing lippia under climate change

This article from Farming Ahead details research on the use of computer simulation models to show how climate change is likely to affect the invasive plant, lippia, in the Murray-Darling Basin and how the results are relevant to other riparian weeds. (3 pages)

Christmas beetles arrive on cue

Find out how the aptly named Christmas beetle knows just when to arrive and what impact they can have on the Australian environment.

Biological control of Scotch broom

Scotch broom is an introduced weed threatening environmental, forestry and grazing land in higher rainfall areas of South-Eastern Australia.

Insect's mating secrets key to protecting Aussie farms

CSIRO scientists are combining micro sensing, sterile insect technology and new insect trapping systems to protect our farms from one of Australia’s most economically damaging pest - the Queensland fruit fly.

Chemical testing helps woolgrowers meet tougher eco rules

All textile producers and processors must meet tough new standards if they want to do business in Europe. CSIRO’s internationally accredited chemical testing service is assisting the wool industry comply with Europe’s Eco-label requirements.
 

Finding the jewels in crown rot research

This article from Farming Ahead discusses how the discovery of wheat and barley lines resistant to crown rot could, with further research, make losses from this disease a thing of the past. (3 pages)

Zoonotic diseases of bat origin

Building on our knowledge and experience of henipah viruses (Hendra and Nipah viruses) and other bat-borne diseases.

Willow sawfly

Willow sawfly, first identified in Australia in 2005 and now well established in the ACT and surrounding areas (Queanbeyan, Braidwood and Cooma) of south east New South Wales (NSW), attacks both pest and amenity willows.

Ms Sandra Crameri: using microscopy to detect disease agents

Ms Sandra Crameri is an electron microscopist working within the microbiologically secure Australian Animal Health Laboratory (AAHL) in Geelong, Victoria. As Diagnostic Laboratory supervisor, her focus is on diagnostic activities within the imaging facility.

CSIRO aids tsunami recovery (Podcast 12 Mar 2007)

Discover how CSIRO’s been at the forefront of the post-tsunami reconstruction effort on the island of Pra Thong, off Thailand’s west coast in this three minute podcast. (3:07)

Modelling Climate Change Impacts on Sleeper and Alert Weeds: results of CLIMEX models Part 2

This document contains profiles for 13 of the 41 alert and sleeper weed species that were assessed for their potential to change distribution due to climate change as part of the report Modelling Climate Change Impacts on Sleeper and Alert Weeds. (93 pages)

Protecting crops against Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus

Plants with total immunity to the devastating Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus could be a step closer thanks to breeding of resistant species and the creation of a synthetic gene primed to recognise the virus and destroy it. (2 pages)

Strengthening scientific research links between Australia and China

An agreement between CSIRO and the Chinese Academy of Inspection and Quarantine (CAIQ) will facilitate joint research in biosecurity and quarantine between Australia and China.

United Nations goes crazy over ant management

Dhimurru Aboriginal Corporation, Rio-Tinto Alcan Gove and CSIRO are celebrating winning the prestigious Biodiversity category of the United Nations Association of Australia World Environment Day Awards tonight.

Improving wheat yields for global food security

With the world’s population set to reach 8.9 billion by 2050, CSIRO scientists are hunting down and exploiting a number of wheat’s key genetic traits in a bid to substantially boost its grain yield.

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