Scientists working at physical containment level four (PC4), the highest level available.

Safeguarding Australia

Providing an integrated approach to Australia's national biosecurity combining world-leading scientific expertise with cutting-edge diagnostic, surveillance and response capabilities.

Dr Helen Murphy: understanding tropical forest dynamics and threats

Dr Helen Murphy is interested in the dynamics of tropical forests and the role of invasive species and climate change in their structure and functioning.

Renowned animal scientist appointed new Chief

A renowned animal scientist who has had a highly distinguished career in research and teaching both in the US and Australia, has been appointed as the new Chief of CSIRO Livestock Industries.

CSIRO scientists discover a new bat virus in humans

CSIRO scientists have played a key role in discovering that bats are the likely host of a new virus that can cause a serious but apparently non-fatal respiratory tract illness in humans.

Dr Paul De Barro: Theme Leader for Reducing Likelihood - biosecurity preparedness and prevention

As well as research on silverleaf whitefly and the viruses it transmits, Dr Paul De Barro is heavily involved in Australian biosecurity planning and invasive species.

Darwin: Berrimah, NT (Darwin laboratory)

The CSIRO Darwin laboratory provides a focus for ecological and socioeconomic research underpinning sustainable land management in northern Australia. It is also home to a CSIRO Science Education Centre.

Dr John Lowenthal: Theme Leader, A One Health approach to Emerging Infectious Diseases

Dr Lowenthal is an immunologist who has focused his research in the area of veterinary health and immunology, particularly in poultry.

Re-writing ‘the book’ on a devastating poultry disease

A world-first discovery made by a Monash University PhD student working at CSIRO’s Australian Animal Health Laboratory (AAHL) in Geelong, has poultry scientists worldwide taking a fresh look at the devastating bacterial disease, necrotic enteritis.

Bushfire publications: papers (pre-2000)

CSIRO provides reprints of many of its bushfire research papers at no charge.

United Nations goes crazy over ant management

Dhimurru Aboriginal Corporation, Rio-Tinto Alcan Gove and CSIRO are celebrating winning the prestigious Biodiversity category of the United Nations Association of Australia World Environment Day Awards tonight.

Dr Kemal Kazan: analysing plant defence responses

Dr Kemal Kazan researches model and crop plants to analyse signalling processes regulating plant defence responses.

Calicivirus comes under attack

This article from Farming Ahead looks at how CSIRO researchers are unravelling the source of possible resistance to rabbit calicivirus and looking for new approaches to control rabbits. (3 pages)

Bushfire simulator

Learn about CSIRO's bushfire simulator, which researchers have used to rigorously test the behaviour of firefighting vehicles and equipment, fencing, water tanks and civilian vehicles under bushfire conditions.

Vaccine protects from deadly Hendra virus

CSIRO scientists have shown that a new experimental vaccine helps to protect horses against the deadly Hendra virus.

National database of agent release sites

This spreadsheet contains information on release sites for bridal creeper biocontrol agents in Australia, including the leafhopper Zygina species, the rust fungus Puccinia myrsiphylli and the leaf beetle Crioceris species.

Dr Greg Constable: leading cotton research

Dr Greg Constable is a leader in cotton research, investigating plant breeding, genetically modified cotton varieties, higher yield management packages, improved sustainability and reducing insecticide use.

Farmer-researcher cooperation a key to better farming: Grains Week 2006

Greater cooperation between researchers and grower groups will improve Australian farming practices and enrich rural communities, according to a researcher working for CSIRO and the Grains Research & Development Corporation (GRDC).

Environmentally friendly microbes go mining (Podcast 06 Mar 2009)

An extremophile is any microbe that has adapted to living conditions of extreme temperature, pressure or chemical concentration. This adaption allows certain types of extremophile bacteria to be used in the extraction of metal from ore through the process of bioleaching. (4:25)

Scientists eradicate deadly cattle disease (Podcast 13 Jul 2011)

Elimination of the deadly cattle plague virus rinderpest makes it the first animal disease in history to have been wiped out by humans. (10:43)

Termites get the vibe on what tastes good

Researchers from CSIRO and UNSW@ADFA  [external link] have shown that termites can tell what sort of material their food is made of, without having to actually touch it. The findings may lead to improvements in the control of feeding termites.

The shared water resources of the Murray-Darling Basin (Part 2)

This 49-page report focuses on six identified risks to shared water resources in the Murray-Darling Basin, water quality and river health: climate change, farm dams, afforestation, groundwater extraction, bushfires and irrigation water management.

Carbon dioxide maintains organic grains in premium condition

Carbon dioxide is the mainstay for effective insect control in stored organic and biodynamic grains.

21st Century Agricultural Revolution

This document includes session one presentations from the Biosecurity in the new bioeconomy: threats and opportunities symposia held 18-21 November 2009 in Canberra, Australian Capital Territory. (199 pages)

Eye-in-the-sky helps pinpoint prickly problem

CSIRO research on a tool to track the spread of the devastating weed prickly acacia across Australia’s northern grasslands is described in this article from Farming Ahead. (3 pages)

Tiwi Carbon Study: managing fire for Greenhouse gas abatement

Tiwi Islanders and CSIRO are working together to examine the biophysical and economic potential of fire management for Greenhouse gas abatement on the Tiwi Islands, as a basis for possible livelihood opportunities for Tiwi people.

CSIRO reveals how continents can break apart

A paper co-authored by CSIRO’s Professor Klaus Regenauer-Lieb and published in Nature today reveals new information on the strength of continents and how they can split apart.

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