Scientists working at physical containment level four (PC4), the highest level available.

Safeguarding Australia

Providing an integrated approach to Australia's national biosecurity combining world-leading scientific expertise with cutting-edge diagnostic, surveillance and response capabilities.

Living with grassfires in Australia

Myths are debunked and fire behaviour revealed in the second edition of CSIRO’s essential guide to grassfires – Grassfires: Fuel, Weather and Fire Behaviour.

CSIRO Pyrotron ignites bushfire research

CSIRO has built a bushfire wind tunnel to research how bushfires spread and improve the safety and fire-fighting capabilities of Australian communities.

Livestock industries’ future – value or volume?

Australasia’s major annual livestock industries’ science conference – Horizons in Livestock Sciences – will be held in Christchurch, New Zealand, from 28-30 October.

Bushfire impact on water yields

While forest fires can often result in an initial increase in water runoff from catchments, it’s the forests and bush growing back that could cause future problems for water supplies by reducing stream flows.

Fire speed – faster than a speeding bullet?

Bushfires are often reported as moving at phenomenal speeds that would outrun a speeding car – but can they really go that fast?

Aussie ravens ruled out as West Nile virus indicators

Scientists at CSIRO’s Australian Animal Health Laboratory (AAHL) in Geelong, Victoria have found that birds are unlikely to be used as part of an ‘early warning’ system designed to alert health authorities to the presence of the deadly West Nile virus in Australia.

Mozzie protein alert to invading viruses

CSIRO scientists have discovered how mosquitoes develop viral immunity, potentially leading to improved vaccines, and other control measures, for mosquito-borne viruses such as dengue and West Nile.

Geelong scientist receives Eureka recognition

Geelong scientist, Dr Linfa Wang, was last night honoured as a Eureka Prize finalist, recognising his exceptional scientific research in discovering emerging viral diseases such as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS).

New fowlpox vaccine available

A new vaccine developed by CSIRO Livestock Industries to help control the common poultry disease, fowlpox, has been registered for commercial use by one of Australia’s leading animal health companies, Intervet Australia Pty Ltd.

Ocean robots network achieves universal coverage

Scientist’s efforts to fathom how the oceans influence climate and fisheries productivity enter a new era this month with the milestone establishment of a network of 3,000 futuristic, 1.5-metre tall ocean robots operating simultaneously throughout the world’s oceans.

Fuel moisture content and bushfire behaviour

The moisture content of fuel determines the ease with which it will burn, affecting the behaviour and spread of bushfires.

Genomics and Genetics

CSIRO Entomology's gene research contributes to an understanding of the impact of insects on our environment and agriculture.

Noogoora burr throws researchers a curve ball

What do you do when a weed fights back? Noogoora burr in Australia’s tropical north has done just that but CSIRO scientists aren’t letting it get away with it.

Dr Andrew Poole: marshalling advanced materials in the war on biofouling

Dr Andrew Poole’s capabilities span materials science and biological science. He has worked on environmental biotechnology, including microbial separation of oil-in-water emulsions, and microbial treatment of strong effluents. He leads research teams on marine biofouling and eco-friendly protein fibres.

CSIRO joins global fight against pandemic threats

Australian scientists are part of an international consortium creating ‘battle maps’ that visualise how bird flu and other viruses constantly mutate to camouflage their antigens, or ‘invading soldiers’, to avoid being neutralised by the immune system’s ‘artillery’.

Dr Alan Andersen: Darwin Site Leader

Dr Andersen leads CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences Tropical Savannas research in Darwin, and has specialist expertise in ant biodiversity and fire ecology.

Bushfire behaviour and the fire environment

Bushfire behaviour is influenced by the type of available fuel, its amount and its moisture content. Other important factors are the weather, terrain and the fire itself.

Foot and mouth disease simulation in Melbourne

Australia’s ability to mount an effective response to a foot and mouth disease (FMD) outbreak will be tested during the three-day International FMD Symposium and Workshop (FMD2010) beginning in Melbourne today.

Bat immunity key to controlling deadly viruses

CSIRO research into how bats can host some of the world’s deadliest viruses without suffering any ill-effects themselves will lead to improved strategies for controlling the spread of bat-borne diseases.

Fighting rust fungi for farmers (Podcast 25 May 2009)

Rust diseases of cereals are among the oldest plant diseases known to man, and although significant advances have been made against them, they remain a major economic concern for farmers. (5:28)

Drought Report pushes alarm bells (Podcast 15 Jul 2008)

Mr Kevin Hennessy, Principal Researcher, explains why farmers and the Government have reacted with alarm to a collaborative report indicating that hot periods and low rainfall years that have occurred every 20 years, may become much more frequent. (5:36)

CSIRO Grassland Fire Spread Meter

The CSIRO Grassland Fire Spread Meter is used by rural fire authorities to predict a fire’s potential rate of forward spread across continuous grassland in gently undulating terrain.

The deadly nature of animal-to-human disease (Podcast 28 Jan 2011)

Scientists have identified 75 per cent of emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic – meaning they can spread from animals to people. This is likely to increase under environmental intrusion, climate change and progressive urbanisation of the planet. (7:26)

Victory in battle against African big headed ant (Podcast 11 Aug 2008)

The African big headed ant is one of the 100 worst pests in the world, and they’re in Australia. In this podcast, CSIRO ecologist Dr Ben Hoffmann explains how science won the war against a virulent environmental, economic and social threat. (5:04)

Making use of the natural predators and parasites found in native vegetation

This information sheet discusses research on the role of native vegetation as a source of beneficial insects leading to improved pest management strategies for cotton and grain growers. (2 pages)

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