Our food innovation centre has a track record of helping food manufacturing companies innovate. Below is a sample of company success stories in the meat, dairy, beverage, health and technology sectors.

Clextral Pacific

France's leading extrusion technology company, Clextral, along with Australian food process expert company, Inovo, and CSIRO's food innovation centre have developed a world first transformative technology that could develop brand new food products with improved functionality using far less energy than currently needed.

The potential value in future manufacturing of foods and ingredients such as dairy powders, flavours, coffee, nutraceuticals and beverages is estimated in hundreds of millions of dollars. The world's first pilot-scale set up is at CSIRO’s Werribee site and Australian company, Flavourtech, is a commercialisation partner for the technology for tea and coffee globally.

The patented extrusion porosification technology (EPT) process can dry numerous products and ingredients with higher solids content and operates at a lower temperature than regular spray drying. This gives products unique characteristics and improved functional properties. EPT not only saves large amounts of energy, but causes significantly less damage to a food’s flavour and nutritional composition.

[Music plays and CSIRO logo and text appears: Clextral, New technology; new foods]

[Images flash through of Maxime Collado walking through a factory and then working on a computer and then the camera zooms in on Maxime Collado and text appears: Maxime Collado, Project Engineer, Clextral]

Maxime Collado: Clextral is a French company manufacturing extrusion production lines.

[Images flash through of Maxime Collado and two other employees working in the factory]

With the Australian company Innovo we’ve developed award first technology that could lead to big changes in the food industries.

[Camera zooms in on one of the employees and then images flash through of the employee looking at a screen and then the image changes back to Maxime Collado again.]

 The possible future commercial impact for this technology is estimated in hundreds of millions of dollars. 

[Image changes to show Maxime Collado and another employee operating a machine, looking into a stainless steel pot and then the camera zooms in on the powder in the pot]

Extrusion porosification technology, or EPT, is a technology used to dry high concentrated products. 

[Image shows Maxime Collado taking a sample of the powder from the pot]

EPT can handle much more viscous solids than conventional spray drying.

[Image changes back to Maxime Collado and then images flash through of employees working and then image reverts to Maxime Collado]

Advantageous for EPT compared to conventional spray drying technology are better functionality for the products, the flexibility of the platform, energy savings and finally better flavour retention. 

[Image changes to show an employee inspecting the sample in the pot and then images flash through of machinery]

We’ve searched globally for a partner to set up our first pilot plant. 

[Image changes to show an employee looking at a computer screen then the camera zooms in on the sample again]

We’ve choosen to come here to CSIRO because they were the only one able to provide the technical and analytical supports.

[Image changes to show Maxime Collado and then the camera pans along the machinery in the factory and images flash through of an employee operating a machine, Maxime Collado, Maxime Collado inspecting the samples of coffee and then the camera zooms in on the sample]

In collaboration with CSIRO and FIAL through the SME solution centre we’ve piloted EPT applications for high protein dairy and coffee products and we were able to confirm that coffee made with our technology retained more aroma than conventional spray drying does. 

[Camera zooms out to show Maxime Collado and another employee looking at a sample and then images flash through of Maxime Collado in the factory]

This means we’re able to make a soluble coffee powder which tastes the same as fresh roasted coffee. 

[Image changes to show Maxime Collado again]

The funding through FIAL means that we could develop new commercial prototypes and it gets new potential customers at the door.

[Image changes to show an employee working on a computer then the camera pans up to show the employee at his desk]

Overall the work showed that this technology offers real innovation opportunities for the food industry. 

[Image changes to show an employee walking into the Flavourtech building and then images flash through of employees working in the Flavourtech factory]

Our first commercial partner was Flavourtech based in regional New South Wales.  They’ve decided to license our technology for the coffee industries. 

[Image changes to show an employee pouring coffee beans into a hopper]

Partnering with global major company like Flavourtech gives us an access to the coffee and tea industries. The flexibility of the EPT is what is exciting for customers.

[Image changes back to show Maxime Collado and then images flash through of Maxime Collado with two other employees pouring samples and then the camera zooms in on the samples] 

We are able to imagine new ingredients for products such as probiotics, bioactives or flavour that could not be made on standard and conventional drying technologies. 

[Image changes to show Maxime Collado and then the image changes to show two employees operating a machine]

We wouldn’t have been able to do this without the help from CSIRO and their access to a world range of equipment and expertise in the food industry.

[Image changes to show Maxime Collado]

The food application we’ve explored so far is only the tip of the iceberg and there’s a lot more potential application that could go through this technologies.  Companies are welcome to come knock on our door to see how this technology could help them.

[CSIRO, FIAL and Australian Government logos appear with text: The SME Solution Centre, A collaboration between CSIRO and FIAL]

[Music plays and CSIRO logo appears with text: Big ideas start here www.csiro.au]

Clextral: New technology, new foods

Read more about our expertise in Hire of pilot plant equipment and facilities for industry.

Community Chef

Community Chef is a social enterprise that provides quality meals for people nutritionally at risk, often the elderly, people with a disability, hospital patients and aged care residents. The company collaborated with CSIRO and Food Innovation Australia (FIAL) through their SME Solution Centre to support the long term food security and nutritional well-being of those most vulnerable in the community.

[Music plays and text appears: ‘Community Chef: Shaping prepared meals for those in need’]

[Image changes to show the outside of the Community Chef Building and then images flash through of the inside production area of Community Chef]

[Image appears of Joe Ciccarone]

Joe Ciccarone: Hi I’m Joe Ciccarone and I’m proud to be the C.E.O. of Community Chef.

[Image changes to show Joe Ciccarone talking to an employee and then the camera zooms in on the worker weighing food]

[Image changes back to Joe Ciccarone]

Community Chef is a social enterprise that was formed by local government to meet the dietary needs of those that are nutritionally at risk in the community. Typically those that receive Meals on Wheels and now we’ve expanded into hospitals and aged care communities, health and community care and even child and family services.

[Image changes to show meals being prepared on a production line]

Community Chef discovered a need to review the formulation of their meals. The elderly cohort were finding it difficult to eat such a large meal. They’re old, they’re frail and they don’t have big appetites.

[Image changes back to Joe Ciccarone]

So to ask someone who’s 90 years old to consume a meal that weighs almost a kilo is just not feasible. They’re also fearful of wastage.

[Camera zooms in on the reduced size meal package and then zooms out to show a worker packaging the meals]

We realised we needed to do something about that and one of the ways we could see that we could have a positive impact on it was by reducing the size of the meals by increasing the nutritional density of the meals.

[Image changes back to Joe Ciccarone]

We thought about how we could run that project internally, came to the conclusion we just didn’t have the in house capability to do that.

[Image changes to show a woman walking into the CSIRO building and then the camera pans around the inside of the building showing the different work stations]

So we made a connection with the CSIRO and through them FIAL and we were able to secure enough funding to get the project off the ground.

[Camera zooms in on a female CSIRO employee working at the computer and then the camera zooms in on her hands, her face and the dietary books on her desk]

[Image changes back to Joe Ciccarone and then the camera zooms out to show the meals being prepared on the production line again]

Because of the relationship with the CSIRO and FIAL we were able to gain access to the best dietetics minds in Australia combining that with our own in house knowledge and come up with solutions to some of the problems we were facing. Able to increase the nutritional density of our meals using natural ingredients like a milk powder, like beans to boost that nutritional content and get the meal size down.

[Image changes back to Joe Ciccarone and the camera zooms out to show the meals in preparation]

[Images flash through of meals in preparation, a large vat of beans, a worker filling out paperwork, a vat of rice, meals on a conveyer belt and then the camera zooms out to show Joe Ciccarone again]

Without the assistance of a FIAL S.M.E. Centre and the CSIRO we wouldn’t have been able to take these next advances in our menu development to offer a more nutritionally dense meal that clearly benefits our own business but something that we’re going to make available to the wider community.

[Image flash through of meals on a conveyer belt, a female employee and an employee packaging meals]

It also gives us a springboard to approach government and look at a review of the food standards themselves to make sure that they’re relevant in today’s terms.

[Image changes back to Joe Ciccarone]

[Image changes to show the Crown St Stables Community Cafe and the camera pans around the room showing the elderly patrons]

Other ways in which we’re working with local government is in their own social enterprise activities. So Moonee Valley have been really innovative in the way that they’re trying to get good nutrition out into their elderly community.

[Image changes to show an employee serving a customer and then images flash through of the food in preparation]

They recognise that the face of Meals on Wheels is changing and that the whole market’s changing.

[Image changes to show the waiter delivering the meals to the elderly patrons at the table]

People aren’t as sedentary. They’re ageing more healthily which means they’re more mobile and they don’t want to be sitting at home waiting for someone to knock on their door and deliver a meal. We see our role as adding further benefit to the wider community by providing meals into new markets.

[Music plays and text appears: ‘With thanks to Crown Street Stables Community Cafe, a Moonee Valley City Council Initiative. Crown St Stables Community Cafe and City of Moonee Valley’]

[Music plays and CSIRO, FIAL and Australian Government logos appear with text: The SME Solution Centre, A collaboration between CSIRO and FIAL’

[Music plays and CSIRO logo appears with text: Big ideas start here www.csiro.au]

Community Chef - shaping prepared meals for those in need :  Joe Ciccarone, Community Chef CEO, discusses the benefits for his business of working with CSIRO and Food Innovation Australia.

Read more about our expertise for industry in Consumer goods: value-added manufactured food products.

Preshafood

Preshafood manufactures premium fruit juices, seasonal fruit blends, smoothies and vegetable juices using high pressure processing (HPP). HPP is an emerging technology and uses very high pressures instead of heat to kill yeasts, moulds and bacteria.

The juices are the world’s first single variety apple juices and owing to HPP, they retain the taste, colour and fresh-like characteristics of fruit without the need for adding preservatives. They can also be stored up to five times longer than other chilled juices.

CSIRO are world leaders in the development and implementation of HPP technology in not only juices but also across a range of product categories such as meat, poultry, seafood, fruit and vegetable products, meal solutions, dips and sauces.

Preshafood has gone from starting life in our world class pilot plant in Werribee to recently expanding their investment in HPP technology and becoming the largest HPP operation in Australia, creating new jobs and growing sales both in Australia and in export markets.

[Music plays and text appears: Preshfood, High pressure innovation]

 [Images show male walking into factory building and through factory. Image changes to show Alastair Mclachlan, CEO, Preshafood]

 Alastair Mclachlan: We produce a range of products including single variety apple juices, vegetable juices and smoothies.

 [Images flash through various factory processes]

Our life began at the CSIRO. The initial production occurred in the CSIRO food sciences labs. We were really looking for a product that nobody had ever experienced before. To provide shelf life, traditional processes have to heat their products or add preservatives which destroys the nutrition, taste, colour and flavour of juices.

[Image shows Alastair Mclachlan, CEO, Preshafood]

We don’t have to do that at all.

[Image shows factory machinery]

HPP is an emerging technology that uses extremely high pressure rather than heat to kill yeasts, mould and bacteria.

[Images flash through various factory processes]

The unique benefits of HPP are that it gives chilled foods an extended shelf life and doesn’t affect the flavour, colour and nutritional value. It’s all about taste and once you taste it you’ll never go back.

[Image shows Alastair Mclachlan, CEO, Preshafood]

The success of Preshafruit juices is great for everyone.

[Images flash through various factory processes]

From growers to bottle suppliers, carton manufacturers, everyone has been able to participate in the success. Recently we’ve worked with one of our major suppliers Montagues. Using our technology we’ve been able to develop a Jazz single variety apple juice that has spectacular taste.

[Image shows Alastair Mclachlan, CEO, Preshafood]

We see working together with Montagues as an excellent opportunity to provide the market with another superior apple juice.

[Images flash through various factory processes]

Over the past six months we’ve doubled the size of the factory, added a second HPP machine and this has resulted in 20 additional employees and significantly more opportunity for growth in the business over the next four to five years.

[Image shows Alastair Mclachlan, CEO, Preshafood]

Over the last few years we’ve been developing the market in Asia because there are very few other products that are of similar quality in their markets.

[Images flash through various factory processes]

So we see over the next five years many opportunities to grow those markets with a super premium juice that they’ve never experienced previously.

[Image shows Alastair Mclachlan, CEO, Preshafood]

Preshafood is living proof that you can work with the CSIRO to develop super premium products that have not been available to the Australian market or world markets in the past.

[Images flash through various factory processes. Image changes back to Alastair Mclachlan, CEO, Preshafood]

One thing that I am sure of is we would never be in the position that we are now if we didn’t start with the collaborative work with CSIRO.

[Image shows Alastair Mclachlan, CEO, Preshafood standing in front of Preshafood factory]

[Music plays and CSIRO logo appears with text: Big ideas start here www.csiro.au]

Preshafood – high pressure innovation

Read more about our expertise at Preshafruit - high pressure juices.

JBS Australia

Scientists from CSIRO’s food innovation centre worked with JBS Australia to assess a pilot spray chilling installation at their Dinmore plant in Queensland and the effect on storage life of chilled beef. We showed that spray chilling reduced chilling shrink loss hence improving saleable meat yield without any loss of storage life compared with non-spray chilled sides. Following the results of our work, JBS extended spray chilling to all their Australian plants and most other major beef processors followed suit resulting in increased returns to the Australian meat industry as a whole. JBS received an award from the Australian Meat Processing Corporation for this work.

Read more about our expertise in Meat and seafood: opportunities for industry.

Goodman Fielder

Goodman Fielder is a leading food company across Australia, New Zealand and Asia Pacific. They have an extensive portfolio of brands that consumers know and love, covering every meal of the day. The company collaborated with CSIRO and Food Innovation Australia (FIAL) through their SME Solution Centre to create better tasting and healthier dressings, sauces and mayonnaises to meet changing consumer demands.

Goodman Fielder – Safe Innovation

[Music plays, CSIRO logo appears on bottom right hand corner of screen, and text appears:  Goodman Fielder – Safe innovation]

[Image changes to show various images of people working in a laboratory]

[Image changes to show bottles of product]

[Image changes to show the Goodman Fielder logo with text:  goodman fielder our homegrown food company]

[Image changes to show Andre Teixeira]

Andre Teixeira:  I’m Andre Teixeira, Chief R&D and Quality Officer for Goodman Fielder in Sydney.

[Image changes to show Andre Teixeira smiling]

[Image changes to show various images of people working in a laboratory]

[Image changes to show various images of baked breads]

[Image changes to show a man removing bread from an oven]

[Image changes back to Andrew Teixeira]

Goodman Fielder is a food company with a long tradition of supplying consumers in Australia and New Zealand and the Pacific area with a number of food products, among them dressings and mayonnaise and sauces of all kinds.

[Image changes to show a woman carrying a tray of various product bottles]

[Image changes to show various images of people working in a laboratory]

The challenge on this project was that we’re both looking at a taste improvement with the elimination or reduction of vinegar, and at the same time addressing the major health and wellness issue in reducing the amount of sugar and salt in our product, while guaranteeing the perfect food safety.

[Image changes back to Andrew Teixeira]

We came to CSIRO with a problem.

[Image changes to show a man working in a laboratory]

They introduced us to FIAL and the SME Solution Centre, and together we developed a solution for our dressings that was reformulated to our taste, and at the same time with perfect food safety.

[Image changes back to Andrew Teixeira]

[Image changes to show a woman performing an experiment in a laboratory]

We were quite happy to see that CSIRO had already developed a number of solutions that matched exactly what we were looking for potentially in terms of addressing this need for new tastes, while guaranteeing the food safety.

[Image changes back to Andrew Teixeira]

[Image changes to show various images of people working in a laboratory]

Through the SME Solution Centre we’re able to access FIAL’s funding, and CSIRO expertise, which helped us significantly to achieve the goals that we started out with.

[Image changes to show various bottles of product]

[Image changes back to Andrew Teixeira]

We couldn’t have done the work in-house fundamentally because we do not have the scientific capability.

[Image changes to show various images of a food processing plant and products moving on a conveyor belt to be packaged]

[Image changes to show various images of products on shelves]

[Image changes back to Andrew Teixeira]

The difference from where we were before and where we are today as a result of this relationship between FIAL, ourselves, and CSIRO, is the fact that we did not have to invest in scientific capabilities that would take a number of years to materialise and to bear fruit, and we had immediate access to an existing knowledge base that was at arm’s reach for us.

[Image changes to show various images of people working in a laboratory]

And we could immediately see the results by co-operating, by working together in a very collaborative manner.

[Image changes back to Andrew Teixeira]

[Image changes to show various images of people working in a laboratory]

The SME Solution Centre, which is a partnership between FIAL and CSIRO, has provided training via CSIRO to our new product development team in the use of the tool.  That training has a major impact in the way we reformulate products for this project and beyond.

[Image changes back to Andrew Teixeira]

[Image changes to show various images of a food processing plant and products moving on a conveyor belt to be packaged]

The relationship in the future, it can only go further and further and further, because obviously when you have success in one area we immediately become curious about what else we could do.

[Image changes to show a person recording data]

[Image changes to show various images of a food processing plant and products moving on a conveyor belt to be packaged]

[Image changes to show a man driving a forklift]

There are a number of other opportunities, not just problems, but opportunities to create new ideas and bring those ideas into concepts that eventually can become projects for the future.

[Image changes back to Andrew Teixeira]

[Text appears on screen:  The SME Solution Centre, a collaboration between CSIRO and FIAL.  Various logos appear at the bottom of the screen:  CSIRO; FIAL Food Innovation Australia Ltd; Supported by Australian Government]

 [CSIRO logo appears with text: Big ideas start here www.csiro.au]



Goodman Fielder - safe innovation :  Andre Teixeira, Goodman Fielder Chief R&D and Quality Officer, discusses the benefits for his business of working with CSIRO and Food Innovation Australia Ltd.

Read more about our expertise in Food safety and quality in the food industry.

Moira Mac's

Consumer demands have evolved since Dean and Moira Russell first established the company in 1983. In response, Moira Mac’s has adopted high pressure processing, enabling them to develop new product lines that extend the shelf-life of processed meats without chemical preservatives or a high salt content.
We worked with the company in implementing the technology into their business as well as verifying processing conditions for the inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes in their high pressure processed chicken pieces.

Read more about our expertise in Meat and seafood: opportunities for industry.

Popina Foods

[Music plays CSIRO logo and text appears: We asked CSIRO]

[Image changes to outside Popina Food Services building. Then inside to someone operating a forklift and muesli bars being made]

[Image changes to Arnold May, Popina Foods]

Arnold May: Our core business has always been in food manufacture, primarily muesli based breakfast cereals and more recently over about the last ten years we've been making muesli bars.

[Image of different muesli based food products on shelves appear on screen]

We'd heard about a new grain that CSIRO had developed over many years called BARELYmax through their Food Futures program.

BARLEYmax is a grain that has been developed through non-genetic means by CSIRO, it has got the highest fibre of any grain that's on the market and it has a very particular type of fibre and that's called resistant starch, which CSIRO scientists and other scientists around the world are now discovering has got enormous benefits for our digestive health.

[Image changes to show the factory production line in action and then zooms in on the completed products]

We asked CSIRO to more or less authenticate the type of products that we were making in terms of the health that we were offering our consumers and they've been able to do that.

[Image changes to the camera panning in on different areas of the factory and then back to Arnold]

The relationship has been a good one with CSIRO. [Image changes to show the muesli bars being moved along another part of the production line and then back to Arnold]

Through the CSIRO brand and their name, which is a very recognised brand in Australia, we believe that it's helped us, our brand enormously, we're a stronger business now and I have had a very good overall relationship with CSIRO and very happy to have worked with them and hopefully we'll continue to work very successfully with them into the future.

[Music plays and CSIRO logo appears with the text: Big ideas start here www.csiro.au]

Popina Foods on working with us :  Arnold May from Popina Foods explains how he's bringing BARLEYmax grain to your table.

Read more about our expertise in Horticulture and grains: value-added opportunities for industry.

Clover-NuMega Ingredients

Fish oil is a good source of omega-3 fatty acids but is prone to oxidation and development of off-odours and flavours. CSIRO’s scientists overcame these problems by developing a technology that encloses microscopic droplets of fish oil in a food grade material. MicroMAX® masks the fishy flavour and extends the shelf life of omega-3 oils. The technology has unmatched encapsulation efficiency, oil loading capacity and stability.

Fifteen years ago, Clover Corporation, then a small nutrition technology ingredient company based in Melbourne’s West, licensed the technology from CSIRO and since then have been manufacturing omega-3 powdered ingredients using CSIRO’s MicroMAX® technology for local and international food and infant formula companies. Australian supermarket shelves are now stocked with a range of healthy omega-3 enriched food choices created using this unique encapsulation system.

Read more about our expertise in Food and ingredient technologies: opportunities for industry.

Murray Goulburn Cooperative

Murray Goulburn, Australia’s largest dairy company, worked with CSIRO scientists to develop and commercialise a form of simulated moving bed chromatography - continuous separation processes, or CSEP, to manufacture high value dairy protein ingredients such as whey protein isolates and the bioactive, lactoferrin. The company was able to treble its cheese production each year and commercialise protein ingredients from the by-product streams. These ingredients are now used in valuable manufactured products such as the billion dollar sports foods and beverages and meal replacement markets in North America and in infant formula.

Read more about our expertise in Dairy: creating new opportunities for industry.

CSIRO's food innovation centre

Welcome to CSIRO's food innovation centre

[Music plays and CSIRO logo and text appears: Welcome to CSIRO’s food innovation centre]

[Images flash through of people selecting food from fridges and shelves in a supermarket]

Narrator: Consumer demand for healthy, convenient, new and safe food products is rising and market growth in the Asian region is booming.

More than ever manufacturing innovation is critical for the Australian food industry to capture these opportunities and be globally competitive.

[Image changes to show the outside of the CSIRO Food Innovation Centre Melbourne and then image changes to show employees looking at food samples of cheese and then the camera zooms in on a sample of cheese]

At our Food Innovation Centre we work with the food and beverage manufacturing industry to meet these opportunities and add value to their business.

[Images flash through of an employee looking at a sample, operating a computer, the computer screen, a heat shrink bag, a tube being filled with white liquid, an employee looking at a computer screen, the computer screen display, an employee filling a tube with bottles of juice and placing the tube inside a machine, a computer screen display and an employee emptying the tube]

We help companies innovate by creating next generation value added food products and ingredients, improving operating efficiencies, licensing ready to go technologies, making industry connections and adopting and developing new technologies and applications for safer, fresher, healthier and sustainably produced foods and more.

[Image changes to show an employee climbing up some stairs carrying a bag of maize polenta and then the camera shows employees watching a machine in use and then the camera zooms in on their faces]

In the last few years we’ve helped our clients create hundreds of millions of dollars in new food product and ingredient sales locally and in export markets.

[Image changes to show an employee operating the touch screen on a machine and then the image changes to show a machine with lots of tubes and the camera pans up the machine to the top]

This includes more than 25 new products in the retail market nationally.

[Image changes to show an employee operating a machine and then images flash through of different manufacturing machinery]

Companies are invited to use our manufacturing equipment to develop and launch new products into the market or collaborate with us strategically on breakthrough technologies.

[Image changes to show an outside view of the CSIRO facility in Brisbane and text appears: Brisbane]

[Image changes to show employees working with packaged meat and then the camera zooms in on a female writing on a clipboard, employees inspecting the meat, employees cutting a sample from the meat and an employee putting meat inside a machine]

Through our facilities in Brisbane, Melbourne, Adelaide and Sydney we have the most significant and extensive food innovation expertise available in Australia.

[Images flash through of an employee operating a machine]

Our pilot plants are unique facilities with a mix of conventional and emerging technologies supported by world class science.

[Image changes to show three female employees walking down a corridor and text appears: Sydney]

[Images flash through of an employee pouring juice, trying a sample, a computer screen display and a female employee operating machinery]

Our expertise in sensory, flavour, consumer science and food choices is unique helping companies develop new or redefine their existing products.  We help industry manage their food safety and product shelf life and meet food safety regulations in export markets.

[Image changes to show three employees inspecting a dough sample and then the camera zooms in on an employee pulling a sample from the dough and tasting it]

We’re also helping Australian food companies meet the rapidly growing demand in Asia for high value products.

[Image changes to show an employee operating a computer with two display screens and then the camera zooms in on one of the screen displays]

Our researchers help companies reformulate to reduce salt, sugar and fat and develop fortified products with functional health benefits while still meeting the taste preferences of consumers.

[Image changes to show an outside view of the CSIRO in Adelaide and then the image changes to show a male walking through the door and speaking to the receptionist and then the camera zooms in on the paper he is writing on]

We also work with manufacturers to substantiate food and ingredient health claims with expertise in lab scale analysis through to human nutrition trials.

[Images flash through of two people at computers, a person lying down, a computer screen display, a female pouring liquid and a female operating a computer and then the camera zooms in on the liquid being poured and the female operating the computer screen]

Whether you’re a small company with a novel idea or a large one looking to outsource key R and D services companies benefit every day from partnering with CSIRO.

[Camera zooms in on the computer screen and then the camera zooms in on the female employee]

It all starts with a conversation.

[Image changes and CSIRO logo and text appears: Big ideas start here, csiro.au/on]

Welcome to CSIRO's food innovation centre for industry :  Find out how CSIRO's food innovation centre helps food and ingredient manufacturers

To discuss how we can help your business innovate, contact:

  • Peerasak Sanguansri

    Senior Research Engineer/Project Leader - Food and Nutrition

    Peerasak works with major food manufacturers in Australia and overseas developing innovation opportunities in food processing and innnovation.

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