Scientists working at physical containment level four (PC4), the highest level available.

Safeguarding Australia

Providing an integrated approach to Australia's national biosecurity combining world-leading scientific expertise with cutting-edge diagnostic, surveillance and response capabilities.

Refuges harbour pests and beneficial insects

That refuge crops, planted near Bt cotton to prevent resistance developing, also support significant populations of secondary pests and beneficial species is argued in this article from Farming Ahead. (3 pages)

Paterson's curse

Paterson’s curse is an introduced plant and considered both a valuable pasture species and a toxic weed, out competing other plants and poisoning livestock. Several biological control agents have been released in Australia since the late 1980s to help control this weed.

Worm study will help future parasite control

This article from Farming Ahead discusses CSIRO research on genetic and physical variations between different strains of Barber’s pole worm which should help producers develop better management strategies to minimise the impact of this parasite. (3 pages)

The impact of weeds on rainforests following Cyclone Larry

Severe Category 4 Tropical Cyclone Larry hit the North Queensland coast in 2006 causing extensive destruction to rainforest habitats in the Wet Tropics. The widespread disturbance caused by the cyclone provided ideal conditions for rapid recruitment and spread of invasive weeds in Queensland’s rainforests.

Seed longevity of Carduus nutans in Australia

This one-page poster discusses the results of seed longevity experiments for nodding thistle and the consequences for managing this weed in south-eastern Australia.

Foot-and-mouth disease global initiative

AAHL staff are actively involved in an international alliance aimed at developing new vaccines, diagnostic tests and antiviral drugs for foot-and-mouth disease.

Farming Ahead: CSIRO and related articles from 2007

Farming Ahead magazine regularly features CSIRO and related research for the agricultural sector. This is a list of articles published in the magazine throughout 2007.

Original climate benchmark makes a comeback

An original climate benchmark first identified for South Australian farmers in the 1860’s –Goyder’s Line – is on the move, according to a review by scientists and primary producers.

Dr Garry Cook: tropical savanna ecology and management

Dr Garry Cook has more than 25 years experience in researching the sustainable management of tropical savanna landscapes, with an emphasis on the role of fire in savanna dynamics and landscape processes.

Flying foxes out for an evening feed

A video showing flying foxes heading out for an evening feed at Atherton in Far North Queensland. (0:45)

Fighting frog fungus

Australian scientists, including a team at CSIRO, were first to identify a fungus as the cause of mass frog declines in Australia and Panama.

Dead or alive – bridal creeper is bad for environment

Bridal creeper, a native of southern Africa, is an attractive plant once much loved by gardeners. Now it is one of southern Australia’s worst environmental weeds. It smothers native vegetation and its huge tuber mats prevent germination of native plants.

Sustainable Communities Initiative in Victoria: Bass Coast Shire report

This 52-page report documents CSIRO's research findings from the Bass Coast Shire project as part of the Moving Forward Update initiative, funded by Regional Development Victoria.

Dr Shuang Liu: investigating the interface between ecological and economic systems

Dr Shuang Liu is developing ecological-economic models to investigate the full impact of invasive species to assist in delivering effective environmental decision making.

Breeding better salmon

The Food Futures Flagship is improving the quality of Tasmanian Atlantic salmon through a selective breeding program.

Biological control of the Australian broadleaf paperbark in the USA

Introduced deliberately into the USA, the Australian native broadleaf paperbark tree is now an invasive pest in the Everglades of Florida and is the subject of biological control research in Australia.

Science for tomorrow: developments

Four CSIRO research projects from Farming Ahead: invigorating wheat production, accurately mapping water availability, weeding out the risk of pest plants and a survey to help refine seasonal forecasts. (1 page)

Modelling Climate Change Impacts on Sleeper and Alert Weeds: results of CLIMEX models Part 2

This document contains profiles for 13 of the 41 alert and sleeper weed species that were assessed for their potential to change distribution due to climate change as part of the report Modelling Climate Change Impacts on Sleeper and Alert Weeds. (93 pages)

Protecting crops against Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus

Plants with total immunity to the devastating Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus could be a step closer thanks to breeding of resistant species and the creation of a synthetic gene primed to recognise the virus and destroy it. (2 pages)

Strengthening scientific research links between Australia and China

An agreement between CSIRO and the Chinese Academy of Inspection and Quarantine (CAIQ) will facilitate joint research in biosecurity and quarantine between Australia and China.

Improving Murray-Darling Basin health

The Heartlands consortium aims to improve land use in the Murray-Darling Basin to preserve land and water resources and sustain commodity production.

Dr Jen Smith: sheep breeding for wool quality and production

Dr Jen Smith is a quantitative geneticist with particular skills and interest in wool metrology and breeding Merinos for wool quality and disease resistance.

Smart women use science to conquer weeds

A team of PhD students, jointly supported by CSIRO and the University of Queensland, has won a Smart Women - Smart State award for their research investigating the four major mechanisms behind costly and destructive weed invasions.

Locust researcher named as finalist for Eureka Prize

Dr Richard Milner, an Honorary Fellow at CSIRO Entomology in Canberra, has been named as a finalist for the prestigious Sherman Eureka Prize for Environmental Research.

Helping grain growers fight an army of pests

Research into how to reduce the impact of insect-attack on young crops will be a major focus of a National Invertebrate Pest Initiative (NIPI) workshop to be held in Melbourne from 2-4 September.

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