Dr Bruce Hobbs, Research Fellow with CSIRO Exploration & Mining poses in a garden setting.

Dr Bruce Hobbs, Research Fellow with CSIRO Exploration & Mining.

Dr Bruce Hobbs: understanding deformation processes within the earth's crust

Dr Bruce Hobbs, Research Fellow with CSIRO Exploration and Mining, is investigating the fundamental control of mechanics, solid and fluid, on the formation of giant ore deposits.

  • 31 July 2007 | Updated 14 October 2011

In this article

  1. Overview
  2. Publishing History

Overview

Page 1 of 2

Current activities

Dr Hobbs is currently involved in understanding of the aperiodicity of geological structures, numerical modelling of mechanical-fluid flow-chemical-thermal feedback systems, and in driving geoscience computational mechanics to establish:

  • ways of scaling phenomena across these vast ranges of time and of space
  • ways of enabling results established at one temporal or spatial scale to 'handshake' with results established at another scale.

Background

Dr Hobbs is currently an Adjunct Professor at the University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia (WA).

His previous role was as Chief Scientist and Executive Director, Office of Science and Innovation, in the Western Australian State Government. 

The focus of Dr Hobbs' research over the past 40 years has been to gain an understanding of the mechanisms and processes that operate during the brittle and plastic deformation of the Earth's crust and mantle. 

The ultimate aim is to characterise the various modes of deformation that are observed and to present these observations within a rational framework of constitutive laws that are amenable to analytical and numerical analysis so that the behaviour of the crust and mantle under various conditions of temperature, pressure, strain-rate, and chemical composition may be predicted.

The focus of Dr Hobbs' research has been to gain an understanding of the mechanisms and processes that operate during the brittle and plastic deformation of the Earth's crust and mantle. 

These developments are embedded within an overarching framework based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics.

Dr Hobbs has adopted a broad involving field and theoretical studies with physical and numerical experiments. His work has found application in the stability of large open cut mines and in the origin of ore deposits.

Academic qualifications

Dr Hobbs received his Bachelor of Science Geology with First Class Honours in 1959 at The University of Sydney, NSW, Australia.

He completed his Doctor of Philosophy in Geology, also at The University of Sydney, in 1962.

Find out more about our work in Mining & Minerals Tools & Technologies.