Scinema 04 - Festival of Science Film  

About Us
 2004 Program
Enter Your Film
Watch Our Trailer
Sponsors
About Us
Contact Us
Join Our Mailing List

Download your copy of our 2008 program


[PDF, 1.3Mb]

Download the 2008 study guide for classrooms


[PDF, 460kb]


 

Our Film Program

Sustainability: Waste = Food + After us the Heavens can Fall (102mins)

Human Brain: Expedition to the Brain + Unravelled + The Brain Fitness Program (115mins)

Life on the Ice: When the Ice is Broken + Ice People (94mins)

To the Moon and Back: Lunacy + Bigger than Big + The Wonder of it all (99mins)

Animal Kingdom: I Use The Word State + Echidnarama + Wild Beetle Chase + Wild Tasmania (77mins)

Origins of Man: Mungo Man + Who are your Next of Kin? + So Where Do We Come From? (102mins)

Under the Sea: Cinequarium + Symbiosis + The Windows of Life + Jellyfish: A lethal beauty + The Big Blue (102mins)

Making Sense of the World Around Us: Seeing-Feeling + The Colour of Sound + Thunderheads (102mins)

SCINEMA 2008 Festival

In 2008, SCINEMA delivered 8 programs of new science film, with a tour by international multimedia artist Peter McLeish.

Our 2008 films | Guest speaker Peter McLeish | Guest speaker Jasper Montana | Winning films for 2008 | About the 2008 Festival

Our film programs | Our films alphabetically | Young filmmakers program

Our film programs

Sustainability: Waste = Food + After us the Heavens can Fall (102mins)

Human Brain: Expedition to the Brain + Unravelled + The Brain Fitness Program (115mins)

Life on the Ice: When the Ice is Broken + Ice People (94mins)

To the Moon and Back: Lunacy + Bigger than Big + The Wonder of it all (99mins)

Animal Kingdom: I Use The Word State + Echidnarama + Wild Beetle Chase + Wild Tasmania (77mins)

Origins of Man: Mungo Man + Who are your Next of Kin? + So Where Do We Come From? (102mins)

Under the Sea: Cinequarium + Symbiosis + The Windows of Life + Jellyfish: A lethal beauty + The Big Blue (102mins)

Making Sense of the World Around Us: Seeing-Feeling + The Colour of Sound + Thunderheads (102mins)

Our films alphabetically

After Us The Heavens Can Fall
France | 50mins | French and English with English subtitles | D. David Martin | P. Jacques Vichet
Over the past two centuries, men have released enormous quantities of carbon in the atmosphere - carbon which had taken millions of year to develop in the ground. Faced with the facts of climate change, what objectives do we need to set ourselves to attain sustainable development?

Bigger Than Big
Australia. 7mins. English
How big is big? And what’s bigger than that? Journey form the moon to the far reaches of the solar system and experience some of the big (and not so big) objects that fascinate astronomers and the general public alike.

Cinequarium
UK. 7mins. English
Cinema and aquariums are suggested to be similar in their ability to impress with the beauty of nature

Echidnarama
An image from the film ECHIDNARAMAAustralia. 15mins. English
You have probably seen echidnas. But how much do you know about them? Take an intimate journey into the secretive bush lives of these intriguing Australian native animals

Expedition to the Brain
USA | 7mins | English
A gorgeous animation charting the regions of the brain

Ice People
An image from the film ICE PEOPLEUSA. 77mins. English
Emmy-winning filmmaker Anne Aghion spent four months ‘on the ice’ with modern-day polar explorers, to find out what drives dedicated researchers to leave the world behind in pursuit of science, and to capture the true experience of living and working in this extreme environment. Visit the Ice People website.

I Use The Word State
USA. 7mins. English
A humourous short film featuring over 400 Ochrogarter Lunifer -
processionary caterpillars - and the strangely appropriate words of Fredrich Nietzsche.

Jellyfish: A lethal beauty
Germany. 43mins. English
With a history pre-dating the dinosaurs, jellyfish have conquered every underwater habitat from the poles to the tropics

Lunacy
USA. 10mins. English
Part animation, part archival exploration, this film takes you to the
moon and back, exploring madness linked to phases of the moon.

Mungo Man
Australia. 6mins. English
Covers different theories about Mungo Man and where he came from.

Seeing-Feeling
Germany. 3mins. German language
Imagine its dark - showing the link between seeing and feeling in the macroscopic as well as in the nanoscopic world

So Where Do We Come From?
USA. 52mins. English
An extra-ordinary journey of discovery which takes the viewer back through time to discover the fascinating routes that South Africa’s diverse population has followed.

Symbiosis
USA. 6mins. English
Cleaner shrimp and fish interactions in Papua New Guinea

The Big Blue
Australia. 55mins. English
Learn the secrets of the planet’s largest living creature, the Blue Whale

An image from the film THE BRAIN FITNESS PROGRAMThe Brain Fitness Program
USA | 52mins | English | D. Eli Brown | P. Lennlee Keep
Based on the concept of neuroplasticy, the Brain Fitness Program shows the power of the brain to change, adapt and rewire itself.

The Colour of Sound
An image from the film THE COLOUR OF SOUNDUK. 55mins. English
An exploration of the crucial role sound plays in our lives

The Windows of Life
Belgium. 19mins. English
Eyes are the windows of the soul - this film explores the underwater world through the eyes of its many inhabitants

The Wonder of it All
An image from the film THE WONDER OF IT ALLUSA. 82mins. English
Seven of the surviving moonwalkers, including Buzz Aldrin & Edgar Mitchell, reflect on the monumental quest to have a man walk upon the moon.

Thunderheads
Australia. 55mins. English
Clouds are the sleeping giants of climate change. Thunderheads follow a dare-devil experiment trying to better understand clouds and thunderstorms and their role in global warming.

Unravelled
USA | 57mins | English | D. Katrina Fullman | P. Jacqueline Gares
Unravelled combines memoir with scientific investigation to tell you a story of family ties, inheritance and Alzheimer’s disease.

Waste = Food
Holland | 52mins | Dutch & English with English subtitles | D. Rob Van Hattum | P. VPRO Television
Natural resources are being depleted on a rapid scale while production and consumption are rapidly rising in nations like China and India. With their enormous waste production, if nothing is done about it all our resources will be turned into one big landfill.

An image from the film WHEN THE ICE IS BROKENWhen the Ice is Broken
Turkey. 17mins. Turkish & Kurdish with English subtitles
Is life above the ice or below it? We follow a local community living traditionally on the ice.

Who are your Next of Kin?
Iceland. 38mins. Icelandic & English with English subtitles
An image from the film WHO ARE YOUR NEXT OF KINA film about Icelandic family relations and the search for the filmmaker’s own roots on the island.

Wild Beetle Chase
USA. 13mins. English
What drives entomologists to look for creatures at seem so insignificant? A wild beetle chase asks
this question as we follow Dr Mike Ivie on his search for a beetle the size of the head of a pin

Wild Tasmania
Australia. 44mins. English
Film follows the journey of Australia’s largest bird of prey, the Tasmanian Wedge-tailed Eagle, from egg to adulthood. This magnificent bird has lived in the forests of Tasmania for millennia, but its habitat is undergoing rapid change.

Back to top


'Polaris Terrarum' artwork from Peter McLeishPOLARIS TERRARUM - A national speaking tour by international multimedia artist and filmmaker  Peter McLeish.

Peter’s film titled Polaris Terrarum comes from the Latin - meaning Polar Earth. His film is an imaginative journey of images that travels through the ionosphere (high in the earth’s atmosphere) from one Polar Region to the next -exploring atmospheric disturbances caused by global warming. The images demonstrate a view from a high flying aircraft or Space Shuttle. The imagery also chart the shrinking size and changing colour of the polar region as seen from views from up above.

Filmmaker Peter McLeish is in the process of collaborating with scientists and science teams to further develop this project.

Catch Peter’s talk at the following locations

Aug 12 at 6.30pm - University of New South Wales, Sydney
Aug 13 at 9.30am - University of Melbourne
Aug 13 at 1.30pm - RMIT, Melbourne
Aug 14 at 10:45 am - LaTrobe University
Aug 15 at 6.30pm - Discovery Science & Technology Centre, Bendigo
Aug 16 at 4pm at Ballarat Observatory
Aug 18 at 11am - University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba
Aug 19 at 5.30pm - Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane
Aug 20 at 12Noon - College of Art at Griffith University, Brisbane
Aug 21 at 11.15am - Amazing World of Science’, Canberra
Aug 21 at 1pm - ANU School of Art, Canberra
Aug 21 at 6.30pm - The Australian Museum, Sydney
Aug 23 at 2pm - South Australian Museum, Adelaide

Peter has also been awarded the use of the COFA (College of Fine Arts) Flat at the University of New South Wales, Sydney during his stay in Australia.

Peter McLeish is a painter /multi-media artist / filmmaker with a Diplôme d'études Collegiales - Arts Plastiques, Bachelors of Fine Arts & a Masters of Fine Arts degrees.

Peter had received over twenty various types of grants/awards and/or support from different branches of the Canadian and/or Quebec Governments between -1991 to 2008.From 2003 to 2008, his  participation in a number of the events was undertaken with the assistance from:
-The Canadian Embassy in Budapest (2003).
-The Canadian High Commission in London (2003).
-The Canadian High Commission in Canberra (2004).
-The Canadian Embassy, The Hague (2004).
-The Canadian Embassy in Rome (2005).
-The Consulate General of Canada, Chicago (2005)
-the Canadian Embassy in Buenos Aires (2007)
-the Canadian Studies Association of Argentina /ASAEC (2007)
-the Canadian Consulate General in Buffalo, New York (2008)

Peter will also give film presentations and lectures in New Zealand at:

-Massey University in Auckland August 26th
-the University of Auckland in Auckland on August 27th
-University of Canterbury in Christchurch August 28th
-the Victoria University in Wellington on August 29th
-the Otago Museum in Otago  on September 1st

His film presentations in New Zealand are with the assistance from SCINEMA and support undertaken by the Canadian High Commission in Wellington.

His work and research has appeared in many international forums in museums/centers such as the Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum in Chicago-United States, The National Museum of Australia in Canberra-Australia, The Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI) in Melbourne-Australia, the Spazio Oberdan in Milan- Italy , Sala Emilio Saraco / Neuquén Museum of Fine Arts in Neuquén–Argentina, the Ferens Art Gallery in Hull-United Kingdom and recently at the Carnegie Science Center in Pittsburgh-United States. 

He had previously explored -two psychological themes of masked and unmasked portraits from 1991 to 1995. From 1995 to 1997, he developed a several series of works exploring light and movement in underwater environments.

He exhibited his first large- scale art & science installation (based on a Glory -a circular rainbow) titled The Glory Project was presented at Star Theatre in the Planetarium de Montréal from 1998 to 2000.  

Since 2001, Peter has been involved in an art & science collaboration based on Red Sprites with  renown Meteorologist (President of the American Meteorological Society-2005; President-2007-08 of the National Council of Industrial Meteorologists) Walter A. Lyons. This collaboration eventually led to Walter A. Lyons receiving a National Science Foundation grant regarding the collaboration and subsequent creation of Lyons’s DVD titled The Hundred Year Hunt for Red Sprites and interactive website. Peter created the artwork in the The Hundred Year Hunt for Red Sprites as well as his companion-six minute film titled Lightning’s Angels.  Since 2002, both films have been presented at many major International art & science symposiums, conferences, media festivals, science film festivals, science & art museums/centres and planetariums all over the world. Peter’s continued research subsequently led him to an additional collaboration with Dr. Colin Price from the Department of Geophysics and Planetary Science, Tel Aviv University who was working on sprite research within the MEIDEX mission from a ground station with the ill-fated crew of the Columbia in 2003.

Since 2007, Peter has been working on Polaris Terrarum with the collaboration from scientists and science data from around the world.

Back to top

 

Special SCINEMA event
Sunday 24 August at 3.30pm
Queensland Museum South Bank

Meet-the-filmmaker event with Jasper Montana discussing
WILD TASMANIA

 

The 44-minute documentary, ‘Wild Tasmania’, exposes the plight of the endangered Tasmanian Wedge-tailed Eagle, an animal caught in the middle of the logging and pulp mill debate currently raging in Tasmania. This magnificent bird has lived in the forests of Tasmania for millennia, but its habitat is undergoing rapid change. The ancient old-growth trees, not just an ideal home for the eagle, have recently found favour with humans as a source of timber, wood chips and profitable pulp. "This is a very important issue," says Jasper Montana, the 23 year old co-director, camera-person and editor, "the film really shows what's at stake for this magnificent creature.”


An original mix of natural history and social documentary, 'Wild Tasmania' combines the human side of the Tasmanian Forestry debate, including weighty interviews with influential figures such as Australian Greens Leader, Bob Brown and Forestry Tasmania Managing Director, Bob Gordon, with spectacular and rare footage of Australia’s largest bird of prey. To capture footage of the shy eagle’s nesting behaviour, Montana camped out in a bird hide on the edge of a cliff. Entering and exiting the bird hide under the cover of darkness during the 4-month breeding season, Montana spent 18-hour days watching and waiting for activity. “I still wonder if the birds ever knew I was there,” says Montana.

Wild Tasmania was produced by Townsville based production company, Digital Dimensions.

 

About the filmmaker: Wild Tasmania is Jasper's second film to play in SCINEMA - his student production Remember the Tritons won our 2005 student film festival. Jasper has completed degrees in Science and Creative Arts at The University of Melbourne, and hopes to continue to produce science and nature documentaries for television in the future.

 

Back to top

 

SCINEMA Festival of Science Film 2008 Winners Announced
dated 25 August 2008

The outstanding quality of Australia’s science and factual filmmakers was on display in Brisbane as the SCINEMA Festival of Science Film announced the winners of its 2008 Festival last night.

“We were thrilled by the high calibre of films we had to choose from this year” Festival Jury Chairman Wilson da Silva said as he announced the winners at a rooftop party at Queensland Museum South Bank to celebrate the close of a successful National Science Week

Scottish film The Colour of Sound took out Best Film “for the engaging way it conveyed a whole tapestry of science,” da Silva said to the crowd.

Local filmmaker Vickie Guest was on-hand to accept her award for organ-donation doco Over My Dead Body, and told Festival guests she was thrilled to have her film recognised.

Australia’s ABC TV took out three categories in the internationally competitive film festival, which received over 150 entries from 31 countries. 

ABC producer Richard Smith was announced as Best Director for his study of the journey of oil from its birth in the prehistoric past to its role in our greenhouse future, Crude, while Rory McGuinness took Best Cinematography for The Big Blue and producer/director Klaus Toft took the gong for Best Science Television for Thunderheads.

Interestingly, The Big Blue and Thunderheads were among the final films produced by ABC TV’s Natural History Unit, which was closed by the national broadcaster earlier this year.

A young Victorian filmmaker, Kristian Lang, took Best Student Film for his 3rd grade class project Photosynthesis: How it works.

Aside from Kristian’s age and aside from the film’s technical assurance, SCINEMA Festival Director Cris Kennedy announced to the party while presenting Kristian with his trophy, “the film got to the essence of successful science communication, which is to condense complex issues into a vehicle that explains science simply, and in a fun way.”

Kristian’s proud parents were on hand to watch the ten-year-old Ascot Vale Primary School student receive his first international film festival prize.

Other Festival winners included Spain’s Pablo Garcia-Lopez take Best Animation or Experimental for his short film Expedition to the Brain, while the US production The Brain Fitness Program took the Award for Technical Merit.

The awards night brought the 2008 SCINEMA Festival of Science Film to a close. In its eighth year, the festival screened in 150 cities across Australia, and a few in India, New Zealand and the United Kingdom.

A partnership between CSIRO and Cosmos Magazine, the Festival runs under the support of the Department of Industry, Innovation, Science and Research through its National Science Week program.

Festival winners were:

Best Film – The Colour of Sound (Scotland)
Producer: Karen Smyth  Director: Vince Hunter for La Belle Allee Productions
An exploration of the crucial role sound plays in our lives
What the Jury said: This was a beautifully shot, contemporary and relevant study of a whole tapestry of science, that was engagingly told.
Media contact: Karen Smyth on info@labelleallee.com

Best Director – Richard Smith for Crude (Australia) produced for ABC TV
Crude is the story of the incredible journey of oil, from its birth in the prehistoric past to its role in our greenhouse future.
What the Jury said: An ambitious ride through a spectrum of sciences, from history, palaeontology, geology and the atmospheric sciences, in a rollicking cauldron of sights and sounds.

Best CinematographyRory McGuinness for The Big Blue
Producer: Jeni Clevers for ABC TV
This blue-chip documentary reveals the secrets of the planet's largest living creature, the Blue Whale.
What the Jury said: A feast for the eyes focussing on one of our least-known treasures.

Best Experimental/AnimationExpedition to the Brain (Spain)
Producer & Director: Pablo Garcia-Lopez
An animated journey, using Cajal's original historical slides about the discovery of neurons.
What the Jury said: The film explored the human brain as a Fantastic Voyage into a microscopic world that touched on the history of neuroscience, with an individual style that owed a debt to be Cajal and Jules Verne.

Best Student Film Photosynthesis: How it works (Victoria, Asutralia)Producer and Director: Kristian Lang for Ascot Vale Primary SchoolA simple look at how photosynthesis works, made for the filmmaker's 3rd grade class.
What the Jury said: Aside from Kristian’s age (10) and aside from the film’s technical assurance, the film got to the essence of successful science communication, which is to condense complex issues into a vehicle that explains science simply, and in a fun way.

Best Science Television Thunderheads (Australia)
Producer & Director Klaus Toft for ABC TV
Thunderheads follows an intrepid group of storm-chasers into the heart of a thunder storm to look for the role clouds play in climate change.
What the Jury said: A film that gave you a sense for what science should be about – a quest, adventure, passion, perseverance and collaboration. This is what science television should be.

Award for Scientific MeritBrain Fitness Program (USA)
Producer: Lennlee Keep  Director: Eli Brown for Santa Fe Productions
Based on the concept of neuroplasticy, the Brain Fitness Program shows the power of the brain to change, adapt and rewire itself.
What the Jury said: For tackling a very new area of neuroscience – a confident film that covered its science well and left you with a sense of hope. 

Prix du JuryOver My Dead Body (Australia)
Producer: Vickie Guest  Director: Ian Walker for VizPoets
Stripped down to its sellable parts, the recycled human body can be repackaged and sold for around $200,000. Skin and bone form the dead are part of a new resources boom.
What the Jury said: This film tells a challenging and important story in an offbeat way that engages the viewer and conveys the importance of organ donation.
 

Clockwise from top left: Kristian Lang receives his award from Festival Director Cris Kennedy, Jury Chair & Cosmos Magazine Editor-In-Chief with Kristian Lang, some of the crowd at the rooftop party, Jury Member Dr Anna Littleboy talks about the difficulty of selecting winning films from the strong line-up, Queensland filmmaker Vickie Guest receives her trophy, SCINEMA (2005) winning film-maker Jasper Montana with Kristian Lang and his parents Ian and Vickie.

Back to top

About SCINEMA 2008 - The best and brightest science films can be seen in every corner of Australia this coming National Science Week as SCINEMA, Australia’s premier festival of science film, tours to over 150 towns and cities from August 16 to 24.

SCINEMA, a science film, video and multimedia festival, brings a program of science drama, documentaries, and short subjects, as well as a number of guest speakers, to venues from Cairns to Hobart, and Sydney to Perth.

Since its launch in 2000, SCINEMA has played to tens of thousands of people across Australia, and in 2008, our team has curated a program of  amazing films on topics ranging from climate change, human health and natural history, to broader social films. SCINEMA gives many filmmakers an opportunity to have their films, sometimes obscure but always terrific, be seen by an audience. SCINEMA will also play select venues in New Zealand and the United Kingdom, and for the first time, India and the United States.

SCINEMA (pronounced with a long ‘i’ to emphasise the science behind the cinema) is a partnership of the CSIRO, Cosmos Magazine and the National Museum of Australia, with funding from DEST’s National Science Week program, and ACT Department of Health.  (Media release issued 10 March 2008).

Promoting and raising the public level of science literacy is the major driver behind the team who run SCINEMA. We have, for eight years, provided a vehicle for new local talent to have their work screened to a national audience and gain experience and recognition, and we continue this year, screening a program of student films at Canberra's Discovery Centre.

In addition to the film screenings, our line-up will include our international guest, Canadian multimedia artist Peter McLeish, who will present his new work ‘Polaris Terrarum’, a collaboration with the crew of the last Space Shuttle.

A jury (chaired by Wilson da Silva, science journalist and editor of Cosmos science magazine) will preside over the screenings and select winning entries in the competition categories:

  • Best Film

  • Best Director

  • Best Cinematography

  • Best Animation/Experimental

  • Best Narrative Film

  • Best Short

  • Best Science Television

  • Award for Scientific Merit

Winners will be announced on August 24, the closing night of National Science Week. Winners will be announced on the SCINEMA website, and in The Australian newspaper on Saturday 30 August.

Back to top

 

Home | Top of Page

About Us | Enter Your Film | Watch Our Trailer | Sponsors | Links
Past programs - 2009 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | Contact Us | Join Our Mailing List

This page last updated on 9 February 2009
© Copyright 1994-2009, CSIRO Australia

  Australia's Festival of Science Film