For over 60 years we’ve been supporting Australia’s grain industry to improve yields, quality and management, and to combat disease.

The challenge

Keeping Australian grains competitive

A researcher examines wheat spike fertility

Wheat is Australia's most important grain crop, valued at over A$5 billion annually.

Ongoing research is vital to maintaining and improving the competitiveness of Australian wheat and other grains amid global challenges of climate change, plant diseases, food and fuel security and sustainable agriculture practices.

Increasingly, consumers are demanding food products made from grains that have additional health benefits.

Our response

A national and integrated approach

For more than 60 years we've been improving the yield, quality, management and disease resistance of grains, especially wheat.

We've developed new grain varieties for disease resistance, water use efficiency, salt and acid soil tolerance and high vigour.

Researchers examine barley plants with in-build resistance to Barley Yellow Dwarf Virus (BYDV)

Our genetics expertise combined with our capabilities in molecular biology and agronomy, enable us to work right across the Australian grains industry to find solutions to future challenges.

In response to changing consumer preferences, we are developing novel, high value grains with higher fibre and other health benefits. These grains provide opportunities for Australian farmers and food manufacturers to capture emerging, high-value markets.

We're also looking to improve the resilience of grain crops to extreme events such as drought through novel genetic selection and improved farming systems practices.

Do business with us to help your organisation thrive

We partner with small and large companies, government and industry in Australia and around the world.

Case study

Case studies:

Contact us

 
Your contact details
0 / 100
0 / 1900
You shouldn't be able to see this field. Please try again and leave the field blank.

For security reasons attachments are not accepted.