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I get along very well with teachers, because I go in there, sit down and tell them, like Martu side, in English. Then I sometime use my Martu talk, Martuwangka. Tell them the meaning, what this mean? That meaning, meaning all around. I like in class with them, because I've been teaching them to wait to the [Waybuloos 00:00:34] too, them teach us there. Like Martu side. It's good, they have to learn Martu and English together. It's like they never in class, we don't want them to miss out. Like some other children got sent away, and they lost everything. Just know the English, I like these Martu kids to learn, the Martu side here, the English side here. And go wandering into their classes teaching them, it's been good going along, like two ways of learning each other. They get along really well with me, and happy that they learning themselves too on the Martu way.

That's glad, makes me happy to bring them back out on country, and teach them the way that I was taught. I have two ways learning, learn from the land, then another switch over to the school. I like the country. I even get happy when I'm on a ranger trip, going at bush, firstly, way back to where I had my first connection with my country, when I was a little girl.

like it on country. I even ran here, like just taking kids, and learning them the way that I was taught. I get really happy when I got them out on country myself, one day they might grow up and say, "Oh, Nanna Rita is nice teacher to us." And I'll be very proud of myself.

Rita Cutter: Martu Elder

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Yeah, I've been coming to Coolbinia Primary School for about five years I think, when Dr. Lewis invited me to come up and do culture here and we sat down and we mapped out a little program to teach the kids culture. Over that time I've taught the kids and during that time we've also taken the kids for walks up through the Bushland here because the kids come here every day, they spend eight hours a day here and they didn't know about the Bush. That's why I started telling Dr. Lewis that this was what had to be done and that this is an area to care for and look after it, tell them stories about it. How to assist it [inaudible 00:00:38] to survive and sort of basically educate them to look after this bush here. I think a lot of schools should have people like Elaine because her role, I think is pretty important.

                She doesn't interfere what I do, but she takes on board everything that I talk about and she takes it away, analyze it and works out how she can better teach the kids here at school by using the Noongar heritage and the culture. The best thing that can happen to schools is that the principals should open the doors to Aboriginal people, to come in and share the culture and to teach the culture. And I'm not talking all about students, I'm talking about teachers also because there are a lot of very good teachers who are keen to learn about Aboriginal culture and heritage.

Neville Collard: Noongar Elder

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Leonora is a mixed group of people. You've got different language groups. So we're like... Leonora is made of [Ngalia 00:00:08] people,[Lange 00:00:08] people, Juban people, Kuwarra people. So now there are people from the lands, one of would be the mine languages speak, but because I'm one of the Juban, I bring a mixture of language when I teach language its mixed. So there's not a straight, one of the language, it's a mixed culture and it's an evolving, I'd say evolving culture, it has to. I know what's happening on country and whether about plants, animals, places. So I... My personal knowledge as school benefits from it, I can, I'll go, okay, we want to do the... We want to learn about, maybe it's biological science or if it's about plants and animals, whatever, I'll go... Yeah, it's summertime. Now this is what's going to be happening.

                So I can go back into the school and say, okay, you teach us what, this is what we could do. But I do say to the teachers, okay, you need to make sure you go out to your parents, go out to community members inside them. Okay. We want to go out on country with your child or, students. What would you like us to teach your kids? So everything's like seasonal and dependent on rain. And that's usually what we do with school. I'll go, okay, this is what's happening at this time of the year. This happens at this time of the year. You can do biological science, the best time here. Come July, August it's better to look at the emu in the... You can look at the stars and how the stars move, always going, teachers always coming.

                And we've been given the opportunity to always present to the teachers as a whole group. Whether it's at staff meetings or an early close, or, before a PD or something, Susie, and I've been given the opportunity to talk to the teacher. So they have more and more understanding of what's happening or what's expected. And making sure that we've got all the resources that teachers need for when they're at bush, like a toilet.

                People come from all different areas. Young teachers come at... They've never experienced any of what you experienced at in later, or... And I take it for granted that everyone's going to love the bush just like me, everyone loves the bush. And then when you find out, oh, no, they're terrified of this, and this. You go, ah, so yeah.

FiFi Harris: Aboriginal and Islander Education Officer

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Two-way Science has encouraged all of our students, but it's specifically our Aboriginal students that we've got because they actually become the teachers when we do go out in country, but also when we're in the classroom talking about things, and because they're more engaged with it, we're finding better outcomes for our students academically within the science areas.

Learning on country, going out bush is the most amazing experience ever. When you head out there, the Aboriginal students that you've got and the families that you've got, they become the teachers and you follow. You end up learning all sorts of different things because you might go out there as a teacher with a specific outcome in mind. However, because it's out bush, it's unpredictable, so you might go and be looking for a water tree, but you might find a honey ants nest, or you might find tracks of a goanna or an emu or something, and that just ends up just rolling into the next activity in the next activity.

Suzanne Fowler: Role of the Indigenous students

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We understand here at Wiluna that two-way science, which is the understanding of science from a Mardu perspective and a Western perspective is not only important for the student's own sense of identity, not only important for their sense of academic development, but also for the future as citizens of Wiluna and Western Australia and beyond.

Two-way science we see is the key to a sustainable and strong future for us all. So we believed that the students here in Wiluna have a wonderful opportunity to understand the world as it, is from different perspectives. So what we hope and what we aspire for in the students, we actually aspire for in the teachers as well. When they come to Wiluna, we understand that they've come from different places and that we're all learning from each other.

So one of the things that's most important for us, is that when teachers come they're ready for that learning and that they can help inspire the teacher, the students, sorry, to also be ready for that two-way learning, because we know the two-way learning is so important for the relationships, not only here in the school, but the relationships of all of our students with people outside the school

Adriano Truscott: Role of the Teacher

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The intent is for students to understand how important their knowledge is to the greater world. And it's establishing that knowledge on an even keel with Western knowledge. And while Western knowledge is supported so much in television, books, and throughout media, we, and [inaudible 00:00:24] need to almost add extra value because it has so little of those resources and materials out there. So one of the responsibilities of us as a school is to try and support that understanding that the students need to have about their own cultural place and their identity through having language around the school, having mosaics that represent their knowledge, having books in their languages, having families talking to teachers and students about the importance of their knowledge, of their way of thinking. And having that impermanence consistently. This isn't just a NAIDOC day. This is something that we do every day. And as I say, when we have NAIDOC events, because we do, we do celebrate that we do celebrate Harmony Day. We also say that every day is NAIDOC day. Every day is Harmony Day and every day is an opportunity to learn from each other.

Adriano Truscott: Role of the School

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