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9 December 2020 Partner Release

PARTNER RELEASE – A multi-disciplinary team of experts is partnering with the Australian Government to arm water managers and Murray–Darling communities with better knowledge and tools to guide future best practice in water management.

Chair of the panel governing the $20 million Murray-Darling Water and Environment Research Program, Professor Rob Vertessy, said two consortia had been selected following an open tender process – one led by the CSIRO and the other led by La Trobe University.

"Managing the Basin's water resources sustainably is a major challenge and well targeted research is necessary to ensure the best decisions can be made for the Basin's future," Professor Vertessy said.

"We have brought together the diverse expertise of scientists, researchers, First Nations groups and private sector specialists to tackle four research themes: climate adaptation, hydrology, environmental outcomes, and social, economic and cultural outcomes.

"The two consortia bring $7 million of their own resources to the table, significantly extending the reach of the program.

"Over the next four years, these multi-disciplinary teams of experts will conduct practical research that will enhance the ability of water agencies like the Murray–Darling Basin Authority and the Commonwealth Environmental Water Office to undertake their missions more effectively.

"The research will involve working with First Nations people on Country, examining how they have managed water sustainably and fairly over tens of thousands of years, spanning cycles of profound environmental change. In learning from them we hope to better prepare ourselves for the challenges of the future."

A process of scoping the details of the research to be undertaken has commenced and will involve input from researchers, government agencies, industries and communities.

This release originally appeared at: Major science investment to shape future Basin water management

Images

Yanga National Park, near Balranald in south- western New South Wales, boasts one of the world’s largest River Red Gum forests. Over 40 species of waterbirds nest and forage in the park which is also home to rare and endangered wildlife including the Southern Bell Frog. Credit: Tanya Doody, CSIRO

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