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Microporous adsorbents suitable for capturing carbon dioxide directly from the atmosphere.

We've developed new solid adsorbent materials that can capture CO2 directly from air. Our materials are cheap, robust, reusable and efficient at capturing CO2. These adsorbents can play a role in helping industry transition into net zero emissions, or supply CO2to new pathways of use in greenhouses, breweries and building materials.

Carbon dioxide makes up roughly one in 2,500 molecules in our atmosphere. Separating carbon dioxide from other molecules in our air, like water, oxygen and nitrogen, can be a challenge.

Direct air capture (DAC) is a process where CO2 is captured from air using filters or adsorbents (material that can separate different types of molecules) to lower CO2 concentrations.

Our customised, user-friendly, and low-energy-required adsorbents can be reused multiple times. They are easily rechargeable and can be coated or processed to suit different applications.

[Animation image appears of a Direct Air Capture unit and carbon dioxide molecules can be seen being captured in the filters in the unit and text appears above: Direct Air Capture]



Narrator: Direct Air Capture, also known as DAC, is a process where carbon dioxide is captured from air using filters or adsorbents to lower carbon dioxide concentrations.



[Camera zooms in in the adsorbents in the Direct Air Capture Unit]



Adsorbents are amazing materials that can separate different types of molecules.



[Animation image changes to show a world globe with heat lines emitting from the top and a rising temperature gauge can be seen on the right]



DAC can be used to fight global warming.



[Animation image changes to show a city, and smoke can be seen emitting from factory chimneys, and a down arrow appears next to a CO2 sign above the city]



It can capture historical carbon dioxide emissions, as well as reduce carbon dioxide emissions in different working environments.



[Animation image changes to show a “CO2” sign within a circle, and dotted lines join the sign to a bag of cement, three drink containers, and some fruit]



The carbon dioxide captured by DAC can be used in many applications from making cement, to carbonating beverages, and helping our farmers produce better yielding crops in greenhouses.



[Animation image changes to show high rise buildings on a green hill, and text appears: CO2, 1 in 2,500 molecules]



Carbon dioxide makes up roughly one in 2,500 molecules in our atmosphere.



[Animation image changes to show a blue screen filled with floating CO2, H2O, and N2 signs]



So separating carbon dioxide from other molecules in our air, like water, oxygen and nitrogen, can be a big challenge.



[Animation image changes to show a computer and equipment on a lab bench, and adsorbents can be seen on the computer screen with captured CO2 molecules, and text appears above: DAC Development]



To solve this problem, we’ve developed some new solid adsorbent technologies with real-world DAC applications.



[Camera zooms in on the computer screen on an adsorbent circle, and the image shows the pockets in the adsorbent trapping the CO2 molecules, and letting the O2, N2, and H2O molecules to move past]



The power of our technologies lie in their custom-built micropores. These tiny pockets attract and trap carbon dioxide molecules, while allowing other atmospheric molecules to pass by.



[Animation image changes to show a DAC Manufacturing line and text appears above: DAC Manufacturing]



Our materials are cheap, robust, and easy to make.



[Animation image changes to show a down arrow next to a skull and crossbones and an up arrow next to a CO2 sign inside a cage, and text appears: Low Toxicity, High CO2 Capture]



They are low in toxicity and highly efficient at capturing carbon dioxide.



[Animation image changes to show a close view of the adsorbent and water droplets can be seen moving past the adsorbent]



And because they're hydrophobic they work just as well in humidity.



[Animation image shows recycling arrows inside the adsorbent]



Our customized, user-friendly, and low-energy-required adsorbents can be reused multiple times.



[Animation image shows an adsorbent circle appearing on the left with a battery symbol inside, and an adsorbent symbol on the right with a heart symbol with a CO2 sign inside]



They are easily rechargeable and are obsessed with carbon dioxide.



[Animation image changes to show the adsorbent circle at the centre of the screen joined to symbols of a cement bag, an apple, a fizzy drink bottle, and a CO2 tank]



And they can be coated or processed to suit different applications.



[Animation image changes to show a city, and a circled factory can be seen on the left, and then the factory disappears, and a fizzy drink bottle appears in its place, and text appears above: Net zero emissions]



From helping industry in its transition to net zero emissions, to capturing historical carbon dioxide emissions, adding some extra fizz to your beverage, or to just improving air quality,



[Animation image changes to show a black circle in the centre with a rocket moving towards Mars, and signs appear either side: DAC Status Operational, Destination Mars]



our DAC adsorbent technology is simple, effective, and durable with a wide range of applications.



[Music plays and the image changes to show the CSIRO logo and text appears: CSIRO, Australia’s National Science Agency]

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Technology

We've developed some new solid adsorbent technologies with real-world DAC applications. The power of our direct air capture materials lies in their custom-built micropores. These tiny pockets attract and trap carbon dioxide molecules, while allowing other atmospheric molecules to pass by.

Our DAC materials are:

  • cheap, robust, and easy to make
  • low in toxicity and highly efficient at capturing carbon dioxide
  • hydrophobic and work well in humidity.

Applications

Our DAC adsorbent technology is simple, effective, and durable with a wide range of applications:

  • helping industry transition to net zero emissions
  • capturing historical carbon dioxide emissions
  • carbonating beverages
  • indoor and outdoor atmospheric air purification
  • building materials such as cement
  • greenhouses for improved crop yields
  • food packaging and preservation.

Intellectual property

CSIRO has patent protected novel adsorbents for CO2 capture from air.

The team

The team includes multidisciplinary scientists with expertise in developing porous materials for applications in direct air capture, environmental remediation, and gas separations. The team has been involved in the development of patents specific to the capture of carbon dioxide and water from air. The team is experienced in working with local chemical manufacturers.

Could this technology provide you with a competitive edge?

Contact us to find out more about our licensing and investment options.

Other opportunities like this

  • An atmospheric water generation (AWG) prototype that works in almost all humidity conditions to generate potable water.

  • An inexpensive and small unit for capturing carbon dioxide that is agile and readily deployable for different applications in heavy industries, food and beverage production, chemical manufacture, medical and construction.

  • CSIRO's novel structured catalyst for chemical manufacturing.

Contact us

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