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[Music plays and an image appears of an aquaculture salmon farm in the ocean and then text appears: Coasts, CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere, How can modelling and information systems develop the blue economy]

[Image changes to show a crew loading a boat and then leaving the docks]

Dr Karen Wild-Allen: We’re heading out this morning to deploy an ocean glider in Storm Bay, about 60km south east of Hobart. 

[Image changes to show Dr Karen Wild-Allen pointing to an ocean glider on the boat and talking and then the image shows the trajectory of the ocean glider on a computer screen and text appears: Dr Karen Wild-Allen, Project Leader, Storm Bay Biogeochemical Modelling]

Over the next three weeks this glider will profile through the water column, across the Tasmanian shelf from coastal to oceanic water and back. 

[Image continues to show the trajectory of the ocean glider on the computer screen and then the image changes to show Karen talking to the camera]

We’ll be collecting data including temperature, salinity and nutrient levels to characterise the natural ventilation or flushing of Storm Bay.

[Images move through of an aerial shot of the ocean landscape in Tasmania, Dr Beth Fulton talking to the camera, and then the boat moving out to the aquaculture farm]

Dr Beth Fulton: Here in Tasmania, the State Government is keen to explore offshore sites like Storm Bay here for the further development of sustainable and environmentally responsible aquaculture. 

[Image changes to show a view of the aquaculture farm]

John Whittington: The Tasmanian salmon industry has grown rapidly over the last decade. 

[Image changes to show John Whittington talking to the camera outside on the docks and text appears: John Whittington, Secretary, Dept of Primary Industries, Parks, Water & Environment]

It now represents an $800,000,000 a year industry directly employing over 2000 Tasmanians. 

[Images move through of a boat moving through the water around the aquaculture farm, salmon moving through on a conveyor belt, a meal of salmon on a plate, and the boat at the farm again]

We work with all sectors of the aquaculture industry to keep Tasmania at the forefront of the fastest growing sector in the global economy, the blue economy. 

[Image changes to show John talking to the camera]

To do that we seek out and draw upon the best available science.

[Images move through of a glider being deployed from a boat and then Karen talking to the camera]

Dr Karen Wild-Allen: Building on previous studies we’re starting a new three year project to deliver a modelling and information system for Storm Bay. 

[Images move through of the ocean glider being deployed, the glider moving through the water, an animation of the trajectory of the glider on a computer screen and a boat moving through the water]

The State Government wants a comprehensive understanding of the way nutrients move through the water in Storm Bay to inform decisions on the intensity and location of proposed aquaculture. 

[Images move through of Beth talking to the camera, water samples being taken from the ocean glider, and water samples being put into an esky on the boat deck]

Dr Beth Fulton: The CSIRO’s coast programme has long been focussed on the provision of excellent science in support of the development of sustainable blue economy initiatives. 

[Images move through of the water samples being put through the nutrient analyser, Stephen Tibben talking to the camera, and the trajectory of the ocean glider on a computer screen and text appears: Stephen Tibben, Hydrochemist]

Stephen Tibben: By putting the water samples from Storm Bay through this nutrient analyser we are able to validate the highly accurate measurements of nutrients and other chemicals made by the glider. 

[Image changes to show Stephen looking at water samples on the nutrient analyser and then the image changes to show Stephen talking to the camera]

This science will underpin the integrity of the modelling work done by others in the team.

[Image changes to show an animation map of a body of water ecosystem with text labels: zooplankton, nutrients, phytoplankton, benthou, detritus, Optical, Meteorology, Hydrodynamic, Biogeochemical, Sediments]

Dr Beth Fulton: Over a number of years, we’ve developed world leading models and information tools so that we can draw together huge amounts of data 

[Image changes to show Beth talking to the camera]

to make sense of ecosystems such as Storm Bay.

[Images move through of Dr Scott Condie looking at a computer screen map and then Scott talking to the camera and text appears: Dr Scott Condie, Project Leader, Risk-based tools supporting aquaculture]

Dr Scott Condie: I’m part of a sister project also focussed on the Storm Bay region that is translating our numerical simulations into decision support tools. 

[Images move through of the Connie tool on a computer screen]

To do this I will be using the latest version of Connie, a tool that’s been developed here over the past decade. 

[Image changes to show Scott talking to the camera and then images move through of an aerial view of the Great Barrier Reef, and then a city on the shores of the ocean]

Connie has been used extensively in regions such as the Great Barrier Reef as well as in the Chilean aquaculture industry.

[Images move through of two colleagues in conversation, a male working on a computer, colleagues looking at a fish and in conversation at the docks, and Beth working on a computer]

Dr Beth Fulton: We’re currently working with the Chilean authorities to support their development of sustainable management practices. 
[Images move through of the data on her computer screen and then the image changes to show Beth talking to the camera]

The modelling work that I lead for the CSIRO takes a whole of system approach. It looks at the bits in the water but it also looks at the social and economic considerations too. 

[Images move through of a boat in the harbour, and then people unloading large crabs into crates at the docks]

And by taking that big picture we can provide a long-term view.

[Image changes to show Scott talking to the camera and then the camera zooms in on the data on the computer screen behind him]

Dr Scott Condie: Once our models have assimilated all the available data, they can be used by managers to test different management options. 

[Images move through of an animation of the ocean glider moving through the water, an animation of information being fed to a satellite in the night sky, Scott working on a computer, and Karen talking]

Dr Karen Wild-Allen: This means that the field data we collect ultimately contributes to planning for the sustainable development of the blue economy, not just in Storm Bay but across state, national and international boundaries.

[Images move through of the ocean glider being deployed, the boat moving through the water towards the camera, test water samples in the nutrient analyser, and data on a computer screen]

Dr Scott Condie: Engaging CSIRO teams in projects such as Storm Bay gives confidence not only to Government but also industry and the community that we’re receiving the best possible evidence based science. 

[Image changes to show Beth talking to the camera and then the image changes to show an aerial view of a boat moving through the water]

Dr Beth Fulton: CSIRO’s sophisticated modelling and information systems support Government and industry planning that balances society’s well-being in our beautiful natural environment both here and at many locations around the world.

[Music plays and text appears on a blue screen: Interviewees, Dr Karen Wild-Allen, Dr Beth Fulton, John Whittington – DPIPWE, Tasmania, Stephen Tibben, Dr Scott Condie]

[Text appears: Additional Footage Supplied by, Tassal, SOCIB, Dept of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers University, Derek Fulton, SIMA-Austral project, Tourism Tasmania]

[Text appears: For more info csiro.au/coastal-modelling]

[CSIRO logo and text appears: CSIRO Australia’s innovation catalyst]
 

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