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[Music plays and Marine National Facility logo appears]

[Image changes and the CSIRO logo and text appears: Embarking on your voyage]

[Image changes and text appears on a blue screen: Sea Sickness]

Max McGuire: Now that you are underway there are a few things you should know. Sea sickness.

[Image changes to show Max McGuire standing in front of the sea talking to the camera]

Firstly, 90% of research participants will be seasick at some point and this can take a toll on how you feel. Even seasoned seafarers will at some point feel unwell because of the conditions at sea.

[Image changes to show a male looking very pale walking through a door and talking to someone and then turning around and walking out of the room again]

For some seasickness will pass. For others it will come in waves. For some it will be a constant feeling that doesn’t go away.

[Image changes to show the male entering his cabin and sitting on the bed]

If you have a history of seasickness it is important to discuss this with your Chief Scientist, Principal Investigator or Voyage Manager.

[Image changes and text appears on a blue screen: The standard of behaviour on board]

The standard of behaviour on board.

[Image changes to show Max McGuire standing in front of the sea talking to the camera]

Fatigue and seasickness can exacerbate tension and can amplify frustrations. Sir Joseph Banks knew this before embarking on the Matthew Flinders voyage on HMS Investigator in 1801. This is how he instructed his crew.

[Image changes to show a picture of Sir Joseph Banks and text appears: “Their Lordships require that all persons so employ’d do on all occasions conduct themselves peaceably, quietly and civily to each other, each readily assisting the other in his respective department, to the utmost of his ability, in such a manner as will best promote the success of the public service in which they are jointly engaged, and unite their individual endeavour into one general result…” – Sir Joseph Banks, Matthew Flinders Voyage on HMS Investigator in 1801]

“Their Lordships require that all persons so employed do on all occasions conduct themselves peaceably, quietly and civilly to each other, each readily assisting the other in his respective department, to the utmost of his ability, in such a manner as will best promote the success of the public service in which they are jointly engaged, and unite their individual endeavour into one general result”.

[Image changes to show text on a black screen: “I feel isolated”, “I feel constantly anxious”, I’m tired all the time”, “I feel nauseous all the time”, I want to be home with my family”, “I want my mum/partner”, I’m depressed”]

While a lot has changed since then, the instructions Banks gave are just as relevant today.

[Image changes to show the people in the dining room of the ship and then the camera zooms in on the people sitting around the dining table]

While on board Investigator you’ll need to adopt a greater sense of self awareness and conduct yourself with civility to everyone, no matter how you’re feeling.

[Image changes to show Max McGuire standing in front of the sea talking to the camera]

This is because problems and personality issues are exacerbated in a confined space under sometimes adverse conditions and will become more so as the voyage progresses. Understand that for the voyage to be a success, you’ll also need to do your utmost to look after each other and lend a hand whenever it’s needed.

[Text appears on a blue screen: Good days and bad days]

Good days and bad days.

[Image changes to show four people on board the Investigator looking at specimens in black tubs and then the image changes to show people sorting the specimens in a room]

You will be on board a world class research vessel conducting important cutting edge research.

[Camera zooms in on a male’s hand sorting the specimens in a tub and then the image changes to show a sunset over the ocean and the camera pans along the horizon from right to left]

You’ll be among the very few people who get to witness firsthand the awe and wonder of some of the most remote parts of our globe.

[Image changes to show Max McGuire standing in front of the sea talking to the camera]

There’ll be great days and there’ll be days when you’re not feeling so great. It is important to recognise that the majority of research participants will experience some form of discomfort.

[Text appears on a blue screen: Your mental health]

Your mental health.

[Image changes to show Max McGuire standing in front of the sea talking to the camera]

Here are some of the feelings you might come across during your voyage.

[Text appears on a blue screen: I feel isolated. I feel constantly anxious. I’m tired all of the time. I feel nauseous all the time. I want to be home with my family. I want my mum/partner. I’m depressed. I just want to withdraw from everyone on board.]

“I feel isolated”, “I feel constantly anxious”, “I’m tired all the time”, “I feel nauseous all the time”, “I want to be home with my family”, “I want my mum”, “I want my partner”, “I’m depressed”, “I just want to withdraw from everybody on board”.

[Image changes to show Max McGuire standing in front of the sea talking to the camera]

It’s important to understand these signs and proactively seek support. It’s also important to support your ship mates if you think they need help. Your Chief Scientist, Principal Investigator, or Voyage Manager should be your first point of contact.

[Image changes to show the doctor’s cabin on the ship and the camera pans around the room]

On remote voyages, a doctor will be available to discuss your well-being and health concerns. These people will have the training necessary to provide support.

[Image changes to show Max McGuire standing in front of the sea talking to the camera]

Everyone is literally in the same boat. There’s no shame in seeking help.

[Image changes and text appears on a blue screen: Employee Assistance Program 1300 687 327]

If you’re not comfortable speaking to those on board for any reason the CSIRO EAP or Employee Assistance Programme phone number is also available throughout your journey or you can always pick up the phone in your cabin and phone friends and family.

[Image changes to show a male getting into a bunk in a cabin, pulling up the quilt and rolling over and going to sleep]

If someone is not feeling well and needs time off from their work, it’s critical that you support them in seeking treatment and understand that they will already be experiencing feelings of guilt or anxiety for not being fit for duty.

[Image changes and text appears on a blue screen: Positive Interactions]

Positive interactions.

[Image changes to show Max McGuire standing in front of the sea talking to the camera]

When you’re in close proximity to a small group of people there is a possibility that certain aspects of their normal behaviour can become an irritation for you. Again this can be heightened by fatigue and seasickness. It’s important in these moments to remain positive and to address any issues you have directly, working through any personality conflicts positively and directly rather than taking indirect channels to express your grievances.

[Image changes and text appears on a blue screen: Chief Scientist, Principal Investigator, Voyage Manager]

If you need support to do this, speak to your Chief Scientist, Principal Investigator or Voyage Manager.

[Image changes to show four people sitting on beanbags playing a video game on a large screen and then the image changes to show a group of people in the dining room seated at a table]

Investigator is equipped with a number of leisure activities and social opportunities.

[Camera zooms in on the group seated around the dining table]

Get involved with the community on board and build positive relationships with those around you. It will make your voyage much more enjoyable.

[Text appears on a blue screen: Communication]

Communication.

[Image changes to show Max McGuire standing in front of the sea talking to the camera]

While you are away, you’ll still be able to contact family and friends by telephone and email within sensible limits.

[Image changes to show a hand picking up a phone and dialling a number and then the camera zooms out to show a back view of a male talking on the phone]

Keeping connected and following through with your communication strategy with them will be important in avoiding feeling isolated.

[Image changes to show a back view of a male looking at a computer screen and then the camera zooms in on his hand on the mouse and then the image changes to show the screen display]

Remember that social media will generally not be available so ensure you have a communication plan around email updates and periodic phone conversations.

[Image changes to show Max McGuire standing in front of the sea talking to the camera]

You should also be aware that discussing personal issues by email or telephone requires sensitivity by both parties who need to keep in mind the difficulties each are experiencing.

[Music plays and the CSIRO and Marine National Facility logos and text appears: Supporting, enabling and inspiring marine science, Owned and operated by CSIRO on behalf of Australia]

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