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Students explore the importance of sustainable fisheries through discussions and hands-on demonstrations. Fisheries scientist Craig’s work involves travelling to Indonesia and this has provided an opportunity for students to practice their Indonesian language skills through face to face and virtual interaction with Craig.

Curriculum case study - Lansdowne Crescent PS - CSIRO STEM Professionals in Schools

[Teachers and STEM professionals on slides on screen smiling, and sharing skills]

[The CSIRO logo swirls into the centre of the screen]

[Text on screen: STEM Professionals in School]

[Shot of outside of the school]

Ingrid Colman: We're lucky enough to be partnered with Craig Proctor as our STEM professional.

[Ingrid and Craig chatting about lesson plans]

They're getting the science. They're getting the culture, and they're getting the language. Because Craig is fluent in Indonesian.

[Craig is reviewing information handouts for the lesson; the top one reads Tuna Sirip Biru, Program Tanda Arkival]

Craig Proctor: In my career I've been working with Indonesia on their marine fisheries for 8 years at that stage.

[Craig working in his lab]

What I hope to do in all of my visits is to enthuse the kids

[Craig dissecting a fish and inspecting its ear bone]

About marine science. It's around the importance of knowing the age of fish, to fisheries science, to fisheries managers.

[Craig's classroom full of kids looking enthusiastic]

And also then on to the otoliths,

[A diagram describing the otoliths or ear bones of a fish]

The ear bones from the fish's head that we use for aging fish.

[Craig slowly removed the fish from a bag]

With the fish aging class it has that extra spice because I can actually bring along some fish, take the otoliths out and show them under the microscope.

[Craig dissects the fish in front of the groaning students]

Ingrid Colman: Science can be woven into all parts of the curriculum just like language can. And so this partnership, it can be open to all sorts of disciplines.

[The CSIRO logo pops into the centre of the screen, underneath is written Australia's National Science Agency]

[An equation of logos is on the screen with a graduation cap representing teacher, then a plus sign adding it to a STEM professional symbolized by a molecule logo.]

[The equals symbol then connects to a gear logo representing partnership.]

[A circle graph titled Schools with different colours for different percentages on screen, Catholic being 16.3%, Government being 65.8%, Independent/Private being 16.8% and other being 1.1%]

[A map symbolizing national reach with a circle graph to one side. the text under the graph reads "with 29% in regional and remote areas.]

[On the map going clockwise NT 1.5%, QLS 20.8%, NSW 20.9%, ACT 5.9%, TAS 5.2%, VIC 23.9%, SA 8%, WA 13.8%.]

[A graph titled STEM Professionals, the circle graph showing percentages by gender with female at 43.2%, male at 56.6%, and not specified at 0.2%. The text under the graph reads note Female STEM professional representation is significantly higher than the national female STEM qualified population of 17 percent overall asterisk leading to a footnote "from the 2020 program evaluation.]

[Text on centre screen reads The STEM Professionals in Schools project is funded by the Australian Government Department of Education, Skills and Employment. At the bottom of the screen is reads The views expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the Australian Government Department of Education, Skills and Employment.]

[New Screen, text reading STEM Professionals in Schools would like to thank: Ingrid Coleman and the students from Lansdowne Crescent Primary School; Craig Proctor, Fisheries Scientist from CSIRO]

[Fade to black]

Students at Lansdowne Crescent Primary School explore the importance of sustainable fisheries through discussions and hands-on demonstrations.

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We've got Craig helping the kids see real life science and, at the same time, they're seeing a real purpose… he's really made it clear to the children how valuable his knowledge of Indonesian has helped in his liaising with the people in Indonesia through his science.

— Ingrid

School name: Lansdowne Crescent Primary School, Tasmania

Teacher: Ingrid Colman

Year Level: Year 6

STEM Professional: Craig Proctor

STEM Professional occupation: Fisheries scientist – CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere

Australian Curriculum links:

Science

  • Science Understanding - Biological Sciences (ACSSU094)
  • Science as a Human Endeavour – Use and influence of science (ACSHE100)
  • Science Inquiry Skills – Questioning and predicting (ACSIS232)

Mathematics

  • Measurement and Geometry – Using units of measure (ACMMG137)

Language - Indonesian

General capabilities

  • Intercultural understandings

Cross-curriculum priorities

  • Asia and Australia's Engagement with Asia
  • Sustainability

The views expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the Australian Government Department of Education, Skills and Employment or the Australian Government Department of Industry, Science, Energy and Resources.

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