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[Music plays and Marine National Facility logo and text appears]

[Image changes and the CSIRO logo and text appears: Preparing for the voyage]

[Image changes to show Max McGuire standing in front of the sea talking to the camera]

Max McGuire: Right up front it’s critical that you and your loved ones understand the vessel cannot return to port for family emergencies or minor medical conditions. It is very difficult for you to be transferred to land once the ship has departed and all but impossible from remote locations. Time at sea can be up to 60 days. So let’s talk about you. What’s your situation and what are some of the things you need to do to prepare for the voyage ahead?

[Text appears: Do you have a history of sea sickness or just don’t know? How will you cope with the isolation of being at sea? Do you have any medical conditions that might affect your ability to cope? Do you have any special language, cultural or religious needs?]

Do you have a history of sea sickness or just don’t know? How will you cope with the isolation of being at sea? Do you have any medical conditions that might affect your ability to cope? Do you have any special language, cultural or religious needs?

[Image changes to show Max McGuire standing in front of the sea talking to the camera]

If you have any concerns about these questions, it’s important to be honest with your Chief Scientist or Lead Principal Investigator. Discuss the extent to which these might be a problem for you and put measures in place to ensure your health and safety before you agree to proceed.

[Text appears: Your family and friends]

Your family and friends.

[Image changes to show Max McGuire standing in front of the sea talking to the camera]

Consider the impact of this decision on your family and friends. After all, emotionally they will be as much a part of this experience as you. This period of time before the Investigator sets sail is a great time to have a frank and open conversation with your family and friends.

[Image changes to the CSIRO and Marine National Facility logos at the bottom of the screen and an animation image appears of a study desk with a lamp]

Let’s take a look at this case study together.

[Image changes to show an animation of a male scientist and then the image changes to show an animation of a boat on the Sydney Harbour]

PhD candidate John is preparing to join Investigator for the first time and has only previously spent short periods at sea on small research boats in Sydney Harbour.

[Image changes to show an animation of the male scientist and the camera zooms in and then the image changes to show an animation of a ship in the Southern Ocean heading towards Antarctica]

He’s excited but also a little bit anxious about his upcoming 60-day voyage deep into the Southern Ocean where communication with loved ones will be limited.

[Image changes to show an animation of a male, female and three children around a meal table]

John has spoken to his wife and three young children about his time away from home and they have discussed the added pressure, stress and heartache his absence will create for his family.

[Images move through of an older male and female standing side by side each putting a hand on their hip, and then an elderly male in a bed]

His parents are happy to see him at sea, chasing his dreams but are concerned that his grandfather who is terminally ill with perhaps only a short time to live will not be alive when he returns.

[Camera zooms out to show the scientist, a female, and an older couple standing next to the elderly male in the bed]

John has decided to discuss this possibility openly and frankly with his grandfather in the presence of his wife and parents.

[Animation image shows a boat in the Sydney Harbour appearing in a thought bubble next to the scientist]

He explains the voyage is unable to return to port due to family emergencies and it is not possible for participants to be transferred to shore from remote locations.

[Image changes to show an animation of the older male and female, the scientist and a female and three children standing in a row in front of a block of shops]

John’s immediate family are very supportive of his chosen career and are now better prepared emotionally for his time away from them.

[Image changes to show a male looking out over the ocean from the deck of the ship]

Think about the conversations you’ll need to have with your loved ones.

[Image changes to show photos flicking through of a girl, a girl and a man, and a younger girl and a man on an iPad]

What’s your situation and what conversations do you need to have before you leave?

[Image changes to show the waves in the ocean]

What practical problems will your absence create and what strategies can you put in place to minimise these problems?

[Image changes to show Max McGuire talking to the camera and then the image changes to show text on a blue screen: Employee Assistance Programme, 1300 687 327]

If at any point during these discussions you need some additional support, remember CSIRO has a free and confidential counselling service via the E.A.P., or Employee Assistance Programme which is available to all participants regardless of which institution they come from. The E.A.P. also has multilingual services if English is not your first language. The number is on your screen right now. This service is available to your family members as well.

[Text appears: Chief Scientist, Principal Investigator, Voyage Operations Manager]

The science project Chief Scientist, Principal Investigator and M and F Voyage Operations Manager are also available to answer any questions.

[Image changes to show a blue screen and text appears: Communication]

Communication.

[Image changes to show Max McGuire talking to the camera]

It’s important that you agree how you’ll keep in touch with your next of kin.

[Image changes to show a hand picking up a phone and dialling the number and then the camera zooms out to show a male talking on the phone]

The ship schedule is structured around routine so perhaps agreeing to communicate at a particular time each week, each day, or at a regular interval that’s appropriate for you.

[Images move through to show a male looking at a computer screen, the male’s hand operating the mouse, the computer screen and Max talking to the camera]

Agree with friends and your wider network that you’ll send an email at certain intervals bearing in mind that your mobile phone will only work for a few nautical miles from shore and there is limited or no access to social media.

[Music plays and the CSIRO and Marine National Facility logos and text appears: Supporting, enabling and inspiring marine science, Owned and operated by CSIRO on behalf of Australia]

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